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dc.contributor.authorO'Driscoll, B R
dc.contributor.authorKalra, S
dc.contributor.authorGattamaneni, Rao
dc.contributor.authorWoodcock, A A
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-07T11:07:07Z
dc.date.available2010-05-07T11:07:07Z
dc.date.issued1995-05
dc.identifier.citationLate carmustine lung fibrosis. Age at treatment may influence severity and survival. 1995, 107 (5):1355-7 Chesten
dc.identifier.issn0012-3692
dc.identifier.pmid7750330
dc.identifier.doi10.1378/chest.107.5.1355
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/98161
dc.description.abstractPreviously, we have reported in 1990 that 35% of carmustine treated patients (6 of 17) who survived childhood brain tumors died of pulmonary fibrosis between 2 and 13 years after treatment. In addition, 8 patients studied in 1989 (13 to 17 years post treatment), had physiologic and biopsy or radiologic evidence of pulmonary fibrosis. We now report 3 more years of follow-up on these patients. Between 1989 and 1992, two more patients have died of pulmonary fibrosis, giving an overall mortality of 47%. Of the eight patients who died of pulmonary fibrosis, the median age at treatment was 2.5 years, whereas the nine long-term survivors had a median age at treatment of 10 years. All five patients treated below the age of 5 years have died of lung fibrosis. Analysis by the standard survival curve method indicated that patients treated at an age less than 6 years were more likely to die than those treated at an age older than 7 years (p = 0.03). Of the nine survivors, seven were observed over 3 more years. There was a gradual decline in mean forced vital capacity from 55% predicted (range, 44 to 81) to 51% predicted (range, 41 to 72) and total lung capacity fell from 65% predicted (range, 51 to 89) to 57% predicted (range, 47 to 77).
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectBrain Canceren
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
dc.subject.meshAge Factors
dc.subject.meshBrain Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshCarmustine
dc.subject.meshChild
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studies
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshInfant
dc.subject.meshPulmonary Fibrosis
dc.subject.meshSurvival Analysis
dc.subject.meshSurvivors
dc.subject.meshTotal Lung Capacity
dc.titleLate carmustine lung fibrosis. Age at treatment may influence severity and survival.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNorth West Lung Centre, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester, England.en
dc.identifier.journalChesten
html.description.abstractPreviously, we have reported in 1990 that 35% of carmustine treated patients (6 of 17) who survived childhood brain tumors died of pulmonary fibrosis between 2 and 13 years after treatment. In addition, 8 patients studied in 1989 (13 to 17 years post treatment), had physiologic and biopsy or radiologic evidence of pulmonary fibrosis. We now report 3 more years of follow-up on these patients. Between 1989 and 1992, two more patients have died of pulmonary fibrosis, giving an overall mortality of 47%. Of the eight patients who died of pulmonary fibrosis, the median age at treatment was 2.5 years, whereas the nine long-term survivors had a median age at treatment of 10 years. All five patients treated below the age of 5 years have died of lung fibrosis. Analysis by the standard survival curve method indicated that patients treated at an age less than 6 years were more likely to die than those treated at an age older than 7 years (p = 0.03). Of the nine survivors, seven were observed over 3 more years. There was a gradual decline in mean forced vital capacity from 55% predicted (range, 44 to 81) to 51% predicted (range, 41 to 72) and total lung capacity fell from 65% predicted (range, 51 to 89) to 57% predicted (range, 47 to 77).


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