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dc.contributor.authorMerritt, Anita J
dc.contributor.authorPotten, Christopher S
dc.contributor.authorKemp, C J
dc.contributor.authorHickman, John A
dc.contributor.authorBalmain, A
dc.contributor.authorLane, D P
dc.contributor.authorHall, P A
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-21T09:29:21Z
dc.date.available2010-04-21T09:29:21Z
dc.date.issued1994-02-01
dc.identifier.citationThe role of p53 in spontaneous and radiation-induced apoptosis in the gastrointestinal tract of normal and p53-deficient mice. 1994, 54 (3):614-7 Cancer Res.en
dc.identifier.issn0008-5472
dc.identifier.pmid8306319
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/96965
dc.description.abstractThree h after whole-body irradiation (8 Gy) of C57BL x DBA/2 F1 mice, p53 protein was expressed strongly in the stem cell compartment of the small intestine but at lower levels in the colon. At this time, apoptotic cells were also observed in the stem cell position of the small intestine, with fewer in the colon. In mice without copies of the p53 gene (nulls), the levels of spontaneous apoptosis, in both the small intestine and the colon, were not different from wild-type. Irradiation of the nulls with 8 Gy of gamma-rays failed to induce any further apoptosis: the loss of p53 essentially rendered the epithelial cells, from both the small intestine and the colon, radioresistant. The response of the epithelial stem cells of the small intestine suggests that p53 may play a role in the deletion of damaged cells with carcinogenic potential, whereas this process is limited in the colon.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectColonic Canceren
dc.subjectIntestinal Canceren
dc.subjectTumour Suppressor Protein p53en
dc.subject.meshAnimals
dc.subject.meshApoptosis
dc.subject.meshColon
dc.subject.meshColonic Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshDigestive System
dc.subject.meshDigestive System Physiological Phenomena
dc.subject.meshEpithelium
dc.subject.meshIncidence
dc.subject.meshIntestinal Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshIntestine, Large
dc.subject.meshIntestine, Small
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMice
dc.subject.meshMice, Inbred C57BL
dc.subject.meshMice, Inbred DBA
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms, Radiation-Induced
dc.subject.meshTime Factors
dc.subject.meshTumor Suppressor Protein p53
dc.subject.meshWhole-Body Irradiation
dc.titleThe role of p53 in spontaneous and radiation-induced apoptosis in the gastrointestinal tract of normal and p53-deficient mice.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCRC Department of Epithelial Biology, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital (NHS) Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom.en
dc.identifier.journalCancer Researchen
html.description.abstractThree h after whole-body irradiation (8 Gy) of C57BL x DBA/2 F1 mice, p53 protein was expressed strongly in the stem cell compartment of the small intestine but at lower levels in the colon. At this time, apoptotic cells were also observed in the stem cell position of the small intestine, with fewer in the colon. In mice without copies of the p53 gene (nulls), the levels of spontaneous apoptosis, in both the small intestine and the colon, were not different from wild-type. Irradiation of the nulls with 8 Gy of gamma-rays failed to induce any further apoptosis: the loss of p53 essentially rendered the epithelial cells, from both the small intestine and the colon, radioresistant. The response of the epithelial stem cells of the small intestine suggests that p53 may play a role in the deletion of damaged cells with carcinogenic potential, whereas this process is limited in the colon.


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