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dc.contributor.authorGrech, E D
dc.contributor.authorDodd, Nicholas J F
dc.contributor.authorJackson, M J
dc.contributor.authorMorrison, W L
dc.contributor.authorFaragher, E B
dc.contributor.authorRamsdale, D R
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-07T08:48:46Z
dc.date.available2010-04-07T08:48:46Z
dc.date.issued1996-01-15
dc.identifier.citationEvidence for free radical generation after primary percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty recanalization in acute myocardial infarction. 1996, 77 (2):122-7 Am. J. Cardiol.en
dc.identifier.issn0002-9149
dc.identifier.issn10.1016/S0002-9149(96)90580-9
dc.identifier.pmid8546077
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/95819
dc.description.abstractIn animal models, oxygen-derived free radicals have been found to be important mediators of reperfusion injury to ischemic but viable myocardium. However, in humans, there is no direct evidence of free radical production after the restoration of coronary artery patency in acute myocardial infarction. The purpose of this study was to quantitate and assess the time course of free radical production in coronary venous outflow in patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing successful recanalization of the infarct-related artery by primary percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). Primary PTCA was performed in 17 patients with acute myocardial infarction of < 6 hours duration. Direct free radical production was assessed by coronary venous effluent blood sampling before PTCA and at timed intervals up to 24 hours (or 48 hours in 6 patients) after recanalization. All samples were added to the spin trapping agent alpha-phenyl N-tert butyl nitrone and analyzed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Vessel patency resulted in a sharp increase in free radical signal. Relative to the level before PTCA, the changes reached statistical significance after only 15 minutes (p < 0.05). Peak signals were observed between 1 1/2 and 3 1/2 hours (p < 0.001), then declined up to 5 hours. A second increase in signal level was detected between 18 and 24 hours despite no angiographic evidence of reocclusion. A gradual decline was observed after 24 hours. These findings provide the first direct and quantitative evidence of free radical production in the immediate postrecanalization phase after thrombotic occlusion of a major coronary artery in humans.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAged
dc.subject.meshAngioplasty, Transluminal, Percutaneous Coronary
dc.subject.meshElectron Spin Resonance Spectroscopy
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshFree Radicals
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshMyocardial Infarction
dc.subject.meshSpin Trapping
dc.subject.meshTime Factors
dc.titleEvidence for free radical generation after primary percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty recanalization in acute myocardial infarction.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Cardiology, Cardiothoracic Centre, Liverpool, United Kingdom.en
dc.identifier.journalThe American Journal of Cardiologyen
html.description.abstractIn animal models, oxygen-derived free radicals have been found to be important mediators of reperfusion injury to ischemic but viable myocardium. However, in humans, there is no direct evidence of free radical production after the restoration of coronary artery patency in acute myocardial infarction. The purpose of this study was to quantitate and assess the time course of free radical production in coronary venous outflow in patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing successful recanalization of the infarct-related artery by primary percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). Primary PTCA was performed in 17 patients with acute myocardial infarction of < 6 hours duration. Direct free radical production was assessed by coronary venous effluent blood sampling before PTCA and at timed intervals up to 24 hours (or 48 hours in 6 patients) after recanalization. All samples were added to the spin trapping agent alpha-phenyl N-tert butyl nitrone and analyzed by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Vessel patency resulted in a sharp increase in free radical signal. Relative to the level before PTCA, the changes reached statistical significance after only 15 minutes (p < 0.05). Peak signals were observed between 1 1/2 and 3 1/2 hours (p < 0.001), then declined up to 5 hours. A second increase in signal level was detected between 18 and 24 hours despite no angiographic evidence of reocclusion. A gradual decline was observed after 24 hours. These findings provide the first direct and quantitative evidence of free radical production in the immediate postrecanalization phase after thrombotic occlusion of a major coronary artery in humans.


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