Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorHeaven, Cathy
dc.contributor.authorMaguire, Peter
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-29T12:00:46Z
dc.date.available2010-03-29T12:00:46Z
dc.date.issued1996-02
dc.identifier.citationTraining hospice nurses to elicit patient concerns. 1996, 23 (2):280-6 J Adv Nursen
dc.identifier.issn0309-2402
dc.identifier.pmid8708240
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/95158
dc.description.abstractPatient assessment underpins every aspect of nursing care. However, there is much evidence to suggest that many nurses lack the skills necessary to communicate effectively with their patients, and so assess their individual problems and concerns. Communication studies to date have been descriptive, or have concentrated on acquisition of skills without addressing the impact this has on patient care. This paper reviews a study of 44 hospice nurses who were taught assessment skills. It discusses the impact of training not only on their skill level, but also on their ability to elicit their patients' concerns. It concludes that simple skills training is insufficient to change clinical behavior, and discusses other factors which should be addressed in future training programmes.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subject.meshClinical Competence
dc.subject.meshCommunication
dc.subject.meshEducation, Nursing, Continuing
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHealth Services Needs and Demand
dc.subject.meshHospice Care
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms
dc.subject.meshNursing Assessment
dc.subject.meshNursing Education Research
dc.subject.meshNursing Staff, Hospital
dc.subject.meshProgram Evaluation
dc.titleTraining hospice nurses to elicit patient concerns.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPsychological Medicine Group, Christie Hospital, Manchester, England.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Advanced Nursingen
html.description.abstractPatient assessment underpins every aspect of nursing care. However, there is much evidence to suggest that many nurses lack the skills necessary to communicate effectively with their patients, and so assess their individual problems and concerns. Communication studies to date have been descriptive, or have concentrated on acquisition of skills without addressing the impact this has on patient care. This paper reviews a study of 44 hospice nurses who were taught assessment skills. It discusses the impact of training not only on their skill level, but also on their ability to elicit their patients' concerns. It concludes that simple skills training is insufficient to change clinical behavior, and discusses other factors which should be addressed in future training programmes.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record