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dc.contributor.authorShalet, Stephen M
dc.contributor.authorBrennan, Bernadette M
dc.contributor.authorReddingius, R E
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-23T16:50:57Z
dc.date.available2010-03-23T16:50:57Z
dc.date.issued1997
dc.identifier.citationGrowth hormone therapy and malignancy. 1997, 48 Suppl 4:29-32 Horm. Res.en
dc.identifier.issn0301-0163
dc.identifier.pmid9350443
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000191309
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/94755
dc.description.abstractThe possibility that human growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy might either increase the risk of cancer recurrence in a child who has previously been treated for a brain tumour or leukaemia, or induce de novo cancer, has worried paediatricians for a number of years. Concern arises from animal experiments, the association of acromegaly with malignancy, and the Japanese experience of a cluster of de novo leukaemia cases in children treated with GH. It is reassuring that so far the results from single centre studies and from the pharmaceutical industry surveillance programmes have shown no evidence of an increased risk of malignancy, recurrent or de novo. The confidence intervals, however, are wide and the scientific nature of these studies is flawed as there has never been a prospective randomized study of GH replacement in children with radiation-induced GH deficiency. For clinical reasons, such a study is unlikely to be performed and therefore surveillance must be maintained at a very high level.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectLeukaemiaen
dc.subject.meshAcromegaly
dc.subject.meshChild
dc.subject.meshCluster Analysis
dc.subject.meshGrowth Disorders
dc.subject.meshHuman Growth Hormone
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshJapan
dc.subject.meshLeukemia
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms
dc.subject.meshRadiation Injuries
dc.subject.meshRecurrence
dc.titleGrowth hormone therapy and malignancy.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Endocrinology, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalHormone Researchen
html.description.abstractThe possibility that human growth hormone (GH) replacement therapy might either increase the risk of cancer recurrence in a child who has previously been treated for a brain tumour or leukaemia, or induce de novo cancer, has worried paediatricians for a number of years. Concern arises from animal experiments, the association of acromegaly with malignancy, and the Japanese experience of a cluster of de novo leukaemia cases in children treated with GH. It is reassuring that so far the results from single centre studies and from the pharmaceutical industry surveillance programmes have shown no evidence of an increased risk of malignancy, recurrent or de novo. The confidence intervals, however, are wide and the scientific nature of these studies is flawed as there has never been a prospective randomized study of GH replacement in children with radiation-induced GH deficiency. For clinical reasons, such a study is unlikely to be performed and therefore surveillance must be maintained at a very high level.


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