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dc.contributor.authorHufton, Alan P
dc.contributor.authorDoyle, S M
dc.contributor.authorCarty, H M
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-17T12:00:00Z
dc.date.available2010-02-17T12:00:00Z
dc.date.issued1998-02
dc.identifier.citationDigital radiography in paediatrics: radiation dose considerations and magnitude of possible dose reduction. 1998, 71 (842):186-99 Br J Radiolen
dc.identifier.issn0007-1285
dc.identifier.pmid9579183
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/92343
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiation doses received by paediatric patients examined using a digital radiography unit, and to compare these doses with those received from conventional screen-film systems. In this way, guidelines could be drawn up concerning the magnitude of possible dose reductions achievable using digital radiography. The study was undertaken on approximately 900 patients undergoing abdomen, chest, pelvis and skull examinations. Patients were categorized into the following age groups: 0-1 month, 1-12 months, 1-5 years, 5-10 years and 10-15 years. Approximately half were X-rayed using a Fuji computed radiography system and half using a conventional screen-film system. Entrance surface dose was calculated from the recorded exposure parameters and measured X-ray tube outputs. Dose-area product was recorded directly. Image quality was assessed clinically using criteria recommended by a working group of the Commission of the European Communities. Apart from chest examinations, it was found possible to reduce doses by about 40% on average, by using a computed radiography system instead of a 600 speed screen-film combination. There was no significant difference in the dose for chest examinations. Satisfactory image quality can therefore be achieved by using computed radiography as a 1000 speed system for abdomen, pelvis and skull examinations, and as a 600 speed system for chests. Since very few departments appear to use screen-film systems of speeds greater than 400, then, for most departments, the use of computed radiography would result in dose reductions of at least 60%, or 33% for chests.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
dc.subject.meshAge Distribution
dc.subject.meshChild
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshInfant
dc.subject.meshInfant, Newborn
dc.subject.meshPelvis
dc.subject.meshRadiation Dosage
dc.subject.meshRadiographic Image Enhancement
dc.subject.meshRadiography, Abdominal
dc.subject.meshRadiography, Thoracic
dc.subject.meshRadiometry
dc.subject.meshSkull
dc.subject.meshX-Ray Intensifying Screens
dc.titleDigital radiography in paediatrics: radiation dose considerations and magnitude of possible dose reduction.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNorth Western Medical Physics, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalThe British Journal of Radiologyen
html.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiation doses received by paediatric patients examined using a digital radiography unit, and to compare these doses with those received from conventional screen-film systems. In this way, guidelines could be drawn up concerning the magnitude of possible dose reductions achievable using digital radiography. The study was undertaken on approximately 900 patients undergoing abdomen, chest, pelvis and skull examinations. Patients were categorized into the following age groups: 0-1 month, 1-12 months, 1-5 years, 5-10 years and 10-15 years. Approximately half were X-rayed using a Fuji computed radiography system and half using a conventional screen-film system. Entrance surface dose was calculated from the recorded exposure parameters and measured X-ray tube outputs. Dose-area product was recorded directly. Image quality was assessed clinically using criteria recommended by a working group of the Commission of the European Communities. Apart from chest examinations, it was found possible to reduce doses by about 40% on average, by using a computed radiography system instead of a 600 speed screen-film combination. There was no significant difference in the dose for chest examinations. Satisfactory image quality can therefore be achieved by using computed radiography as a 1000 speed system for abdomen, pelvis and skull examinations, and as a 600 speed system for chests. Since very few departments appear to use screen-film systems of speeds greater than 400, then, for most departments, the use of computed radiography would result in dose reductions of at least 60%, or 33% for chests.


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