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dc.contributor.authorHawnaur, J M
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Richard J
dc.contributor.authorCarrington, Bernadette M
dc.contributor.authorHunter, Robin D
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-12T12:31:37Z
dc.date.available2010-02-12T12:31:37Z
dc.date.issued1998-08
dc.identifier.citationPredictive value of clinical examination, transrectal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging prior to radiotherapy in carcinoma of the cervix. 1998, 71 (848):819-27 Br J Radiolen
dc.identifier.issn0007-1285
dc.identifier.pmid9828793
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/91995
dc.description.abstractThe objectives of this study were to compare tumour staging and volume assessment by examination under anaesthesia (EUA), transrectal ultrasound (TRU) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with invasive carcinoma of the cervix, and to correlate findings with long-term outcome following treatment by radiotherapy. Tumour staging was performed on 60 patients immediately before starting radiotherapy. Clinicians and radiologists performing EUA, TRU or MRI were blinded to the results of other investigations. Tumour stage and dimensions were recorded prospectively for each technique, and analysed for concordance. The relationship between pre-treatment stage, size of tumour and patient outcome after radiotherapy was assessed, using clinical status 5 years after treatment as the truth measure. EUA, TRU and MRI assigned the same tumour stage in only 30% of patients and EUA and MRI agreed tumour stage in a further 27%. In cases of disagreement, the MRI stage correlated better with outcome than the TRU or EUA stage. There was a significant difference between tumour volume obtained from measurements made on MRI and those from TRU. 62% of patients with enlarged lymph nodes on pre-treatment MRI either died, or developed tumour recurrence or metastases. The ability of MRI to assess the full extent of bulky tumours and the presence of lymph node enlargement was an advantage over both EUA and TRU in identifying patients with a poor prognosis.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCancer Invasivenessen
dc.subjectCancer Stagingen
dc.subjectUterine Cervical Canceren
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studies
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshLymphatic Metastasis
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Invasiveness
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Staging
dc.subject.meshPrognosis
dc.subject.meshProspective Studies
dc.subject.meshSingle-Blind Method
dc.subject.meshSurvival Rate
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome
dc.subject.meshUterine Cervical Neoplasms
dc.titlePredictive value of clinical examination, transrectal ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging prior to radiotherapy in carcinoma of the cervix.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Diagnostic Radiology, Victoria University of Manchester Medical School, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Radiologyen
html.description.abstractThe objectives of this study were to compare tumour staging and volume assessment by examination under anaesthesia (EUA), transrectal ultrasound (TRU) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with invasive carcinoma of the cervix, and to correlate findings with long-term outcome following treatment by radiotherapy. Tumour staging was performed on 60 patients immediately before starting radiotherapy. Clinicians and radiologists performing EUA, TRU or MRI were blinded to the results of other investigations. Tumour stage and dimensions were recorded prospectively for each technique, and analysed for concordance. The relationship between pre-treatment stage, size of tumour and patient outcome after radiotherapy was assessed, using clinical status 5 years after treatment as the truth measure. EUA, TRU and MRI assigned the same tumour stage in only 30% of patients and EUA and MRI agreed tumour stage in a further 27%. In cases of disagreement, the MRI stage correlated better with outcome than the TRU or EUA stage. There was a significant difference between tumour volume obtained from measurements made on MRI and those from TRU. 62% of patients with enlarged lymph nodes on pre-treatment MRI either died, or developed tumour recurrence or metastases. The ability of MRI to assess the full extent of bulky tumours and the presence of lymph node enlargement was an advantage over both EUA and TRU in identifying patients with a poor prognosis.


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