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dc.contributor.authorMenasce, Lia P
dc.contributor.authorBanerjee, Saumitra S
dc.contributor.authorEdmondson, David
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Martin
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-11T16:24:54Z
dc.date.available2010-02-11T16:24:54Z
dc.date.issued1998-09
dc.identifier.citationHistiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis (Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease): continuing diagnostic difficulties. 1998, 33 (3):248-54 Histopathologyen
dc.identifier.issn0309-0167
dc.identifier.pmid9777391
dc.identifier.doi10.1046/j.1365-2559.1998.00469.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/91883
dc.description.abstractAIMS: To describe the clinicopathological and immunophenotypic features of 25 cases of Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease (K-F), which remains a poorly recognized entity and is still frequently confused with malignant lymphoma, and to discuss the main diagnostic problems experienced by the referring pathologist. METHODS AND RESULTS: Haematoxylin and eosin sections of 27 lymph node biopsies were re-examined. Immunostains for B-lymphocytes, T-lymphocytes and macrophages were performed. Clinical and follow-up data were obtained through a questionnaire to the referring pathologist or from the patients' notes where available. The suggested initial diagnoses are discussed. The lymph nodes showed a necrotizing process characterized by patchy or confluent areas of necrosis associated with karyorrhexis and absence or paucity of granulocytes. This was associated with a proliferation of large blastic cells consisting of a mixture of T-lymphocytes and histiocytes. Fragmentation of the biopsy was a frequent feature. The diagnosis of K-F was suggested by the referring pathologist in three cases only. The most common suggested diagnosis was that of a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. CONCLUSION: This series documents continuing difficulties in the diagnosis of Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease in the UK and emphasizes that cases are still being mistakenly diagnosed as malignant lymphomas. The diagnosis of Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease merits active consideration in any nodal biopsy showing fragmentation, necrosis and karyorrhexis, especially in young women presenting with cervical lymphadenopathy.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdolescent
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshAntigens, CD
dc.subject.meshAntigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic
dc.subject.meshDiagnosis, Differential
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHistiocytic Necrotizing Lymphadenitis
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshImmunohistochemistry
dc.subject.meshLymphoma
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.titleHistiocytic necrotizing lymphadenitis (Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease): continuing diagnostic difficulties.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Histopathology, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalHistopathologyen
html.description.abstractAIMS: To describe the clinicopathological and immunophenotypic features of 25 cases of Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease (K-F), which remains a poorly recognized entity and is still frequently confused with malignant lymphoma, and to discuss the main diagnostic problems experienced by the referring pathologist. METHODS AND RESULTS: Haematoxylin and eosin sections of 27 lymph node biopsies were re-examined. Immunostains for B-lymphocytes, T-lymphocytes and macrophages were performed. Clinical and follow-up data were obtained through a questionnaire to the referring pathologist or from the patients' notes where available. The suggested initial diagnoses are discussed. The lymph nodes showed a necrotizing process characterized by patchy or confluent areas of necrosis associated with karyorrhexis and absence or paucity of granulocytes. This was associated with a proliferation of large blastic cells consisting of a mixture of T-lymphocytes and histiocytes. Fragmentation of the biopsy was a frequent feature. The diagnosis of K-F was suggested by the referring pathologist in three cases only. The most common suggested diagnosis was that of a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. CONCLUSION: This series documents continuing difficulties in the diagnosis of Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease in the UK and emphasizes that cases are still being mistakenly diagnosed as malignant lymphomas. The diagnosis of Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease merits active consideration in any nodal biopsy showing fragmentation, necrosis and karyorrhexis, especially in young women presenting with cervical lymphadenopathy.


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