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dc.contributor.authorSlevin, Nicholas J
dc.contributor.authorWilkinson, John M
dc.contributor.authorFilby, H M
dc.contributor.authorGupta, Nirmal K
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-23T12:43:40Z
dc.date.available2010-01-23T12:43:40Z
dc.date.issued1997-04
dc.identifier.citationIntracavitary radiotherapy boosting for nasopharynx cancer. 1997, 70 (832):412-4 Br J Radiolen
dc.identifier.issn0007-1285
dc.identifier.pmid9166079
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/90498
dc.description.abstractIntracavitary radiotherapy is conceptually an attractive method of boosting dose to nasopharynx cancer whilst sparing sensitive normal tissues. A high dose rate (HDR) microselectron can be used to deliver a brachytherapy boost conveniently, safely, comfortably and effectively. Following external radiotherapy a single outpatient treatment has been given to patients using the remote afterloading system of sources placed in modified paediatric endotracheal tubes. This has been associated with good primary control and no evidence of serious morbidity in eight patients. The main limitation of this method is restriction of its utilization to small volume primary disease.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectNasopharyngeal Canceren
dc.subject.meshBrachytherapy
dc.subject.meshFollow-Up Studies
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging
dc.subject.meshNasopharyngeal Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome
dc.titleIntracavitary radiotherapy boosting for nasopharynx cancer.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Clinical Oncology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Withington, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalThe British Journal of Radiologyen
html.description.abstractIntracavitary radiotherapy is conceptually an attractive method of boosting dose to nasopharynx cancer whilst sparing sensitive normal tissues. A high dose rate (HDR) microselectron can be used to deliver a brachytherapy boost conveniently, safely, comfortably and effectively. Following external radiotherapy a single outpatient treatment has been given to patients using the remote afterloading system of sources placed in modified paediatric endotracheal tubes. This has been associated with good primary control and no evidence of serious morbidity in eight patients. The main limitation of this method is restriction of its utilization to small volume primary disease.


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