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dc.contributor.authorLyon, Malcolm
dc.contributor.authorRushton, Graham
dc.contributor.authorAskari, Janet A
dc.contributor.authorHumphries, Martin J
dc.contributor.authorGallagher, John T
dc.date.accessioned2010-01-19T16:39:37Z
dc.date.available2010-01-19T16:39:37Z
dc.date.issued2000-02-18
dc.identifier.citationElucidation of the structural features of heparan sulfate important for interaction with the Hep-2 domain of fibronectin. 2000, 275 (7):4599-606 J. Biol. Chem.en
dc.identifier.issn0021-9258
dc.identifier.pmid10671486
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/90037
dc.description.abstractThe interaction of fibronectin with cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans is important biologically in inducing reorganization of the cytoskeleton and the assembly of focal adhesions. The major heparan sulfate-binding site in fibronectin, which is also implicated in these morphological events, is the COOH-terminal Hep-2 domain. We describe the first extensive study of the structural determinants required for the interaction between heparan sulfate/heparin and Hep-2. It is clear that, in heparan sulfate, there is a very prominent role for N-sulfate groups, as opposed to a relatively small apparent contribution from carboxyl groups. Furthermore, a minimal octasaccharide binding sequence appeared to contain at least two 2-O-sulfated iduronate residues, but no 6-O-sulfate groups. However, affinity was enhanced by the presence of 6-O-sulfates, and the interaction with Hep-2 also increased progressively with oligosaccharide size up to a maximum length of a tetradecasaccharide. This overall specificity is compatible with recent information on the structure of Hep-2 (Sharma, A., Askari, J. A., Humphries, M. J., Jones, E. Y., and Stuart, D. I. (1999) EMBO J. 18, 1468-1479) in which two separate, positively charged clusters, involving up to 11 basic amino acid residues (mostly arginines with their preferential ability to co-ordinate sulfate groups), could form a single extended binding site.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.mesh3T3 Cells
dc.subject.meshAnimals
dc.subject.meshChromatography, Affinity
dc.subject.meshChromatography, High Pressure Liquid
dc.subject.meshChromatography, Ion Exchange
dc.subject.meshFibronectins
dc.subject.meshGlycosaminoglycans
dc.subject.meshHeparitin Sulfate
dc.subject.meshMice
dc.subject.meshMolecular Structure
dc.titleElucidation of the structural features of heparan sulfate important for interaction with the Hep-2 domain of fibronectin.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCancer Research Campaign Department of Medical Oncology, University of Manchester, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester M20 4BX, United Kingdom. mlyon@picr.man.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of Biological Chemistryen
html.description.abstractThe interaction of fibronectin with cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans is important biologically in inducing reorganization of the cytoskeleton and the assembly of focal adhesions. The major heparan sulfate-binding site in fibronectin, which is also implicated in these morphological events, is the COOH-terminal Hep-2 domain. We describe the first extensive study of the structural determinants required for the interaction between heparan sulfate/heparin and Hep-2. It is clear that, in heparan sulfate, there is a very prominent role for N-sulfate groups, as opposed to a relatively small apparent contribution from carboxyl groups. Furthermore, a minimal octasaccharide binding sequence appeared to contain at least two 2-O-sulfated iduronate residues, but no 6-O-sulfate groups. However, affinity was enhanced by the presence of 6-O-sulfates, and the interaction with Hep-2 also increased progressively with oligosaccharide size up to a maximum length of a tetradecasaccharide. This overall specificity is compatible with recent information on the structure of Hep-2 (Sharma, A., Askari, J. A., Humphries, M. J., Jones, E. Y., and Stuart, D. I. (1999) EMBO J. 18, 1468-1479) in which two separate, positively charged clusters, involving up to 11 basic amino acid residues (mostly arginines with their preferential ability to co-ordinate sulfate groups), could form a single extended binding site.


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