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dc.contributor.authorRenehan, Andrew G
dc.contributor.authorPainter, John E
dc.contributor.authorO'Halloran, Domhnall J
dc.contributor.authorAtkin, Wendy S
dc.contributor.authorPotten, Christopher S
dc.contributor.authorO'Dwyer, Sarah T
dc.contributor.authorShalet, Stephen M
dc.date.accessioned2009-11-23T11:16:21Z
dc.date.available2009-11-23T11:16:21Z
dc.date.issued2000-09
dc.identifier.citationCirculating insulin-like growth factor II and colorectal adenomas. 2000, 85 (9):3402-8 J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.en
dc.identifier.issn0021-972X
dc.identifier.pmid10999841
dc.identifier.doi10.1210/jc.85.9.3402
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/86663
dc.description.abstractCirculating insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) may be risk factors for the development of colorectal cancer. On the other hand, IGF-II and IGFBP-2 are overexpressed in colorectal carcinomas. These contrasting backgrounds led us to investigate the relationship between serum IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-2, and IGFBP-3 and the presence of colorectal adenomas, known precursors of colorectal carcinoma, in 345 volunteers attending a screening flexible sigmoidoscopy trial (entry criteria: healthy, aged 55-64 yr). The most striking finding was an elevated mean serum IGF-II in individuals with adenomas (n = 52) compared with controls (mean difference, 139 ng/mL; 95% confidence intervals, 82, 196; P < 0.0001). Logistic regression adjusting for confounding factors confirmed the significant association between IGF-II and adenoma occurrence (P < 0.0001) and revealed an additional positive association with serum IGFBP-2 (P < 0.0001). However, there was no association found between either serum IGF-I and/or IGFBP-3 and the presence of adenomas. Additionally, in 31 individuals with adenomas in whom levels were determined pre- and postpolypectomy, there was a significant fall in mean IGF-II (P < 0.001) and IGFBP-2 (P < 0.001) after adenoma removal, but no difference in IGF-II and IGFBP-2 concentrations between repeated samples in 20 individuals without adenomas. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated IGF-II expression in 83% of all adenomas, which contrasted with absent expression in normal colonic expression and hyperplastic polyps. This study has shown for the first time that serum IGF-II may be a tumor marker in individuals with colorectal adenomas. Further studies are needed to validate these relationships in larger populations, including individuals undergoing colonoscopy.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectColorectal Canceren
dc.subjectBiological Tumour Markersen
dc.subject.meshAdenoma
dc.subject.meshColorectal Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshImmunohistochemistry
dc.subject.meshInsulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 2
dc.subject.meshInsulin-Like Growth Factor I
dc.subject.meshInsulin-Like Growth Factor II
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshRegression Analysis
dc.subject.meshSigmoidoscopy
dc.subject.meshTumor Markers, Biological
dc.titleCirculating insulin-like growth factor II and colorectal adenomas.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, Christie Hospital National Health Service Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom.en
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolismen
html.description.abstractCirculating insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) and IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) may be risk factors for the development of colorectal cancer. On the other hand, IGF-II and IGFBP-2 are overexpressed in colorectal carcinomas. These contrasting backgrounds led us to investigate the relationship between serum IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-2, and IGFBP-3 and the presence of colorectal adenomas, known precursors of colorectal carcinoma, in 345 volunteers attending a screening flexible sigmoidoscopy trial (entry criteria: healthy, aged 55-64 yr). The most striking finding was an elevated mean serum IGF-II in individuals with adenomas (n = 52) compared with controls (mean difference, 139 ng/mL; 95% confidence intervals, 82, 196; P < 0.0001). Logistic regression adjusting for confounding factors confirmed the significant association between IGF-II and adenoma occurrence (P < 0.0001) and revealed an additional positive association with serum IGFBP-2 (P < 0.0001). However, there was no association found between either serum IGF-I and/or IGFBP-3 and the presence of adenomas. Additionally, in 31 individuals with adenomas in whom levels were determined pre- and postpolypectomy, there was a significant fall in mean IGF-II (P < 0.001) and IGFBP-2 (P < 0.001) after adenoma removal, but no difference in IGF-II and IGFBP-2 concentrations between repeated samples in 20 individuals without adenomas. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated IGF-II expression in 83% of all adenomas, which contrasted with absent expression in normal colonic expression and hyperplastic polyps. This study has shown for the first time that serum IGF-II may be a tumor marker in individuals with colorectal adenomas. Further studies are needed to validate these relationships in larger populations, including individuals undergoing colonoscopy.


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