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dc.contributor.authorIvanov, Andrei
dc.contributor.authorBeers, Stephen A
dc.contributor.authorWalshe, Claire A
dc.contributor.authorHoneychurch, Jamie
dc.contributor.authorAlduaij, Waleed
dc.contributor.authorCox, Kerry L
dc.contributor.authorPotter, Kathleen N
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Stephen M
dc.contributor.authorChan, Claude H T
dc.contributor.authorKlymenko, Tetyana
dc.contributor.authorErenpreisa, Jekaterina
dc.contributor.authorGlennie, Martin J
dc.contributor.authorIllidge, Timothy M
dc.contributor.authorCragg, Mark S
dc.date.accessioned2009-11-03T14:21:08Z
dc.date.available2009-11-03T14:21:08Z
dc.date.issued2009-08
dc.identifier.citationMonoclonal antibodies directed to CD20 and HLA-DR can elicit homotypic adhesion followed by lysosome-mediated cell death in human lymphoma and leukemia cells. 2009, 119 (8):2143-59 J. Clin. Invest.en
dc.identifier.issn1558-8238
dc.identifier.pmid19620786
dc.identifier.doi10.1172/JCI37884
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/85227
dc.description.abstractmAbs are becoming increasingly utilized in the treatment of lymphoid disorders. Although Fc-FcgammaR interactions are thought to account for much of their therapeutic effect, this does not explain why certain mAb specificities are more potent than others. An additional effector mechanism underlying the action of some mAbs is the direct induction of cell death. Previously, we demonstrated that certain CD20-specific mAbs (which we termed type II mAbs) evoke a nonapoptotic mode of cell death that appears to be linked with the induction of homotypic adhesion. Here, we reveal that peripheral relocalization of actin is critical for the adhesion and cell death induced by both the type II CD20-specific mAb tositumomab and an HLA-DR-specific mAb in both human lymphoma cell lines and primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. The cell death elicited was rapid, nonapoptotic, nonautophagic, and dependent on the integrity of plasma membrane cholesterol and activation of the V-type ATPase. This cytoplasmic cell death involved lysosomes, which swelled and then dispersed their contents, including cathepsin B, into the cytoplasm and surrounding environment. The resulting loss of plasma membrane integrity occurred independently of caspases and was not controlled by Bcl-2. These experiments provide what we believe to be new insights into the mechanisms by which 2 clinically relevant mAbs elicit cell death and show that this homotypic adhesion-related cell death occurs through a lysosome-dependent pathway.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectLeukaemiaen
dc.subject.meshActins
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Monoclonal
dc.subject.meshAntigens, CD20
dc.subject.meshApoptosis
dc.subject.meshAutophagy
dc.subject.meshCell Adhesion
dc.subject.meshCell Communication
dc.subject.meshCell Line
dc.subject.meshHLA-DR Antigens
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshLeukemia
dc.subject.meshLymphoma
dc.subject.meshLysosomes
dc.subject.meshMembrane Microdomains
dc.subject.meshMicrovilli
dc.titleMonoclonal antibodies directed to CD20 and HLA-DR can elicit homotypic adhesion followed by lysosome-mediated cell death in human lymphoma and leukemia cells.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCRUK Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, School of Cancer and Imaging Sciences, School of Medicine, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom.en
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of Clinical Investigationen
html.description.abstractmAbs are becoming increasingly utilized in the treatment of lymphoid disorders. Although Fc-FcgammaR interactions are thought to account for much of their therapeutic effect, this does not explain why certain mAb specificities are more potent than others. An additional effector mechanism underlying the action of some mAbs is the direct induction of cell death. Previously, we demonstrated that certain CD20-specific mAbs (which we termed type II mAbs) evoke a nonapoptotic mode of cell death that appears to be linked with the induction of homotypic adhesion. Here, we reveal that peripheral relocalization of actin is critical for the adhesion and cell death induced by both the type II CD20-specific mAb tositumomab and an HLA-DR-specific mAb in both human lymphoma cell lines and primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. The cell death elicited was rapid, nonapoptotic, nonautophagic, and dependent on the integrity of plasma membrane cholesterol and activation of the V-type ATPase. This cytoplasmic cell death involved lysosomes, which swelled and then dispersed their contents, including cathepsin B, into the cytoplasm and surrounding environment. The resulting loss of plasma membrane integrity occurred independently of caspases and was not controlled by Bcl-2. These experiments provide what we believe to be new insights into the mechanisms by which 2 clinically relevant mAbs elicit cell death and show that this homotypic adhesion-related cell death occurs through a lysosome-dependent pathway.


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