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dc.contributor.authorKim, S Samuel*
dc.contributor.authorRadford, John A*
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Martin*
dc.contributor.authorVarley, Jennifer*
dc.contributor.authorRutherford, Anthony J*
dc.contributor.authorLieberman, Brian A*
dc.contributor.authorShalet, Stephen M*
dc.contributor.authorGosden, Roger*
dc.date.accessioned2009-10-13T09:31:01Z
dc.date.available2009-10-13T09:31:01Z
dc.date.issued2001-10
dc.identifier.citationOvarian tissue harvested from lymphoma patients to preserve fertility may be safe for autotransplantation. 2001, 16 (10):2056-60 Hum. Reprod.en
dc.identifier.issn0268-1161
dc.identifier.pmid11574491
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/84127
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Ovarian failure is a common sequel to chemo/radiotherapy in patients successfully treated for cancer. Harvesting, cryopreserving and subsequently re-implanting ovarian cortical grafts can be used to re-establish reproductive potential in women with cancer. The safety issue, however, is of great concern because residual disease in autografted ovarian tissues might cause recrudescence of disease. METHODS: A total of 30 non-obese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/LtSz-SCID) mice were individually xenografted s.c. with frozen-thawed ovarian tissue from 18 patients with lymphoma [13 Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) and 5 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL)]. The animals were autopsied at 16 weeks, or earlier if cachectic. The xenograft, liver, spleen, sternum, para-aortic lymph nodes and thymus were prepared for histology, immunohistochemistry and human DNA microsatellite analysis. RESULTS: None of the animals grafted with ovarian tissue from lymphoma patients developed disease. However, all 3 animals grafted with lymph node tissue from an NHL patient developed B-cell lymphomas that were confirmed as human in origin by DNA microsatellite analysis. CONCLUSION: Ovarian tissue harvested before high-dose chemotherapy for HL or NHL may not carry a risk of disease transmission by autotransplantation, although the possibility is difficult to exclude completely.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCancer Invasivenessen
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshAnimals
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshFertility
dc.subject.meshHodgkin Disease
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshInfertility, Female
dc.subject.meshLymphoma
dc.subject.meshLymphoma, B-Cell
dc.subject.meshLymphoma, Non-Hodgkin
dc.subject.meshMice
dc.subject.meshMice, SCID
dc.subject.meshMicrosatellite Repeats
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Invasiveness
dc.subject.meshOvary
dc.subject.meshThymus Gland
dc.subject.meshTissue and Organ Harvesting
dc.subject.meshTransplantation, Autologous
dc.subject.meshTransplantation, Heterologous
dc.titleOvarian tissue harvested from lymphoma patients to preserve fertility may be safe for autotransplantation.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCentre for Reproduction, Growth and Development, University of Leeds, Leeds, UK. medssk@att.neten
dc.identifier.journalHuman Reproductionen
html.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Ovarian failure is a common sequel to chemo/radiotherapy in patients successfully treated for cancer. Harvesting, cryopreserving and subsequently re-implanting ovarian cortical grafts can be used to re-establish reproductive potential in women with cancer. The safety issue, however, is of great concern because residual disease in autografted ovarian tissues might cause recrudescence of disease. METHODS: A total of 30 non-obese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/LtSz-SCID) mice were individually xenografted s.c. with frozen-thawed ovarian tissue from 18 patients with lymphoma [13 Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) and 5 non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL)]. The animals were autopsied at 16 weeks, or earlier if cachectic. The xenograft, liver, spleen, sternum, para-aortic lymph nodes and thymus were prepared for histology, immunohistochemistry and human DNA microsatellite analysis. RESULTS: None of the animals grafted with ovarian tissue from lymphoma patients developed disease. However, all 3 animals grafted with lymph node tissue from an NHL patient developed B-cell lymphomas that were confirmed as human in origin by DNA microsatellite analysis. CONCLUSION: Ovarian tissue harvested before high-dose chemotherapy for HL or NHL may not carry a risk of disease transmission by autotransplantation, although the possibility is difficult to exclude completely.


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