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dc.contributor.authorSheen, Aali J
dc.contributor.authorDrake, David
dc.contributor.authorLangton, Stephen
dc.contributor.authorSherlock, David J
dc.date.accessioned2009-09-07T16:07:20Z
dc.date.available2009-09-07T16:07:20Z
dc.date.issued2002
dc.identifier.citationUnusual bony colorectal metastases in post-hepatometastasectomy patients. 2002, 9 (3):379-82 J Hepatobiliary Pancreat Surgen
dc.identifier.issn0944-1166
dc.identifier.pmid12353151
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s005340200044
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/80147
dc.description.abstractColorectal cancer metastases occur predominantly in the liver, with extrahepatic sites being far less common and equally distributed in the lung, brain, skin, and bone. We report two cases of unusual bony metastases of colorectal cancer. A 55-year-old man underwent an abdominoperineal resection for a Dukes B carcinoma of the rectum, followed 17 months later by a right hemihepatectomy for metachronous liver metastases. He subsequently presented 11 months later with a solitary metastatic deposit in the mandible. Seven months after resection and reconstruction, he remained well and disease-free. A 67-year-old man underwent a right hemicolectomy and right hemihepatectomy for carcinoma of the cecum and synchronous liver metastases. He presented 16 months later with a lesion suspicious of metastases in his clavicle. He subsequently died 18 months after his original operation. The prolongation of survival after hepatic metastasectomy results in the presentation of metastases at sites not commonly seen in colorectal malignancy. Postoperative surveillance after apparently curative hepatectomy should be directed to the evaluation of any unusual new symptoms.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectBone Canceren
dc.subjectColorectal Canceren
dc.subjectLiver Canceren
dc.subjectMandibular Canceren
dc.subject.meshAged
dc.subject.meshBone Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshClavicle
dc.subject.meshColorectal Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshCombined Modality Therapy
dc.subject.meshFibula
dc.subject.meshHepatectomy
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshLiver Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMandibular Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome
dc.titleUnusual bony colorectal metastases in post-hepatometastasectomy patients.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartments of Surgery, North Manchester General and Christie Hospitals, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Hepato-Biliary Pancreatic Surgeryen
html.description.abstractColorectal cancer metastases occur predominantly in the liver, with extrahepatic sites being far less common and equally distributed in the lung, brain, skin, and bone. We report two cases of unusual bony metastases of colorectal cancer. A 55-year-old man underwent an abdominoperineal resection for a Dukes B carcinoma of the rectum, followed 17 months later by a right hemihepatectomy for metachronous liver metastases. He subsequently presented 11 months later with a solitary metastatic deposit in the mandible. Seven months after resection and reconstruction, he remained well and disease-free. A 67-year-old man underwent a right hemicolectomy and right hemihepatectomy for carcinoma of the cecum and synchronous liver metastases. He presented 16 months later with a lesion suspicious of metastases in his clavicle. He subsequently died 18 months after his original operation. The prolongation of survival after hepatic metastasectomy results in the presentation of metastases at sites not commonly seen in colorectal malignancy. Postoperative surveillance after apparently curative hepatectomy should be directed to the evaluation of any unusual new symptoms.


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