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dc.contributor.authorWilkinson, James M
dc.contributor.authorHarris, Maggie A
dc.contributor.authorDavidson, Susan E
dc.contributor.authorWelch, Richard
dc.contributor.authorHunter, Robin D
dc.contributor.authorSwindell, Ric
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-28T08:35:32Z
dc.date.available2009-08-28T08:35:32Z
dc.date.issued2003-12
dc.identifier.citationA retrospective study of bladder morbidity in patients receiving intracavitary brachytherapy as all or part of their treatment for cervix cancer. 2003, 76 (912):897-90 Br J Radiolen
dc.identifier.issn0007-1285
dc.identifier.pmid14711778
dc.identifier.doi10.1259/bjr/68756213
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/79053
dc.description.abstractA retrospective study has been undertaken in an attempt to identify physical parameters that could confidently be used to predict an enhanced risk of bladder morbidity following intracavitary brachytherapy. 366 women received brachytherapy as all, or part, of their treatment for cervical cancer at the Christie Hospital in 1990 and 1991, and of these, 60 patients developed identifiable bladder morbidity (graded on a scale of 1-4 using the Franco-Italian glossary). These were age and stage matched with 60 asymptomatic women who were also treated for cervical cancer by brachytherapy during the same time period. The sizes of applicators used in the two groups were noted and compared. The two groups were also compared with respect to the heights of the applicator set above the symphysis pubis, the degree of anteversion or retroversion of the applicator sets and where possible, the doses at the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) bladder reference point. Where CT scans of the applications were available, these were reviewed to see if any differences in the size, shape or location of the bladder were apparent. No significant difference was found between the two groups of patients for any of the parameters investigated. The physical factors investigated in this study cannot be used to reliably predict bladder complications. There was a significant correlation between bladder morbidity and morbidity in other pelvic sites.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectUterine Cervical Canceren
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshAged
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and over
dc.subject.meshBrachytherapy
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshRadiation Dosage
dc.subject.meshRadiation Injuries
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies
dc.subject.meshTomography, X-Ray Computed
dc.subject.meshUrinary Bladder
dc.subject.meshUterine Cervical Neoplasms
dc.titleA retrospective study of bladder morbidity in patients receiving intracavitary brachytherapy as all or part of their treatment for cervix cancer.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNorth Western Medical Physics, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester M20 4BX, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalThe British Journal of Radiologyen
html.description.abstractA retrospective study has been undertaken in an attempt to identify physical parameters that could confidently be used to predict an enhanced risk of bladder morbidity following intracavitary brachytherapy. 366 women received brachytherapy as all, or part, of their treatment for cervical cancer at the Christie Hospital in 1990 and 1991, and of these, 60 patients developed identifiable bladder morbidity (graded on a scale of 1-4 using the Franco-Italian glossary). These were age and stage matched with 60 asymptomatic women who were also treated for cervical cancer by brachytherapy during the same time period. The sizes of applicators used in the two groups were noted and compared. The two groups were also compared with respect to the heights of the applicator set above the symphysis pubis, the degree of anteversion or retroversion of the applicator sets and where possible, the doses at the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) bladder reference point. Where CT scans of the applications were available, these were reviewed to see if any differences in the size, shape or location of the bladder were apparent. No significant difference was found between the two groups of patients for any of the parameters investigated. The physical factors investigated in this study cannot be used to reliably predict bladder complications. There was a significant correlation between bladder morbidity and morbidity in other pelvic sites.


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