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dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Malcolm B
dc.contributor.authorCarrington, Bernadette M
dc.contributor.authorDavidson, Susan E
dc.contributor.authorSwindell, Ric
dc.contributor.authorLawrance, Jeremy A L
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-27T15:47:48Z
dc.date.available2009-08-27T15:47:48Z
dc.date.issued2003-07
dc.identifier.citationStaging of advanced cervical carcinoma using MRI-predictors of outcome after radical radiotherapy. 2003, 58 (7):532-41 Clin Radiolen
dc.identifier.issn0009-9260
dc.identifier.pmid12834636
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/S0009-9260(03)00114-4
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/78979
dc.description.abstractAIM: To assess the prognostic significance of imaging findings used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) staging of cervical carcinoma by correlation with survival after radiotherapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MRI examinations of 99 cervical carcinoma patients were reviewed. Tumour involvement of pelvic structures was assessed. Lymph node sites, short axis diameters and signal characteristics were recorded. MRI staging was compared with clinical [International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO)] staging. Univariate analysis was performed for MRI stage, clinical stage, nodal status and pelvic structure involvement against disease-specific (DSS) and disease-free survival (DFS). RESULTS: MRI staging correlated with DSS (p=0.006) and DFS (p=0.007) but clinical staging did not. Pelvic nodes > or = 10 mm and juxtaregional or distant nodes > or = 8 mm short axis were most strongly associated with survival (p=0.014, p=0.011 and p=0.001, respectively, for association with DSS). Tumour involvement of pelvic bowel loops, pelvic sidewall and bladder mucosa were significantly associated with poor DSS and DFS (p<0.05). Tumour dimensions and bladder muscle involvement alone were not associated with poor survival. CONCLUSION: MRI staging is a better predictor of survival than clinical staging in patients receiving radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma. MRI assessment of lymph node enlargement and tumour involvement of pelvic structures gives valuable prognostic information.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCancer Invasivenessen
dc.subjectCancer Stagingen
dc.subjectUterine Cervical Canceren
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshAged
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and over
dc.subject.meshEpidemiologic Methods
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshLymphatic Metastasis
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Invasiveness
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Staging
dc.subject.meshPrognosis
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome
dc.subject.meshUterine Cervical Neoplasms
dc.titleStaging of advanced cervical carcinoma using MRI-predictors of outcome after radical radiotherapy.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Diagnostic Radiology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Wilmslow Road, Withington, M20 4BX, Manchester, UK. ben.taylor@christie-tr.nwest.nhs.uken
dc.identifier.journalClinical Radiologyen
html.description.abstractAIM: To assess the prognostic significance of imaging findings used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) staging of cervical carcinoma by correlation with survival after radiotherapy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: MRI examinations of 99 cervical carcinoma patients were reviewed. Tumour involvement of pelvic structures was assessed. Lymph node sites, short axis diameters and signal characteristics were recorded. MRI staging was compared with clinical [International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO)] staging. Univariate analysis was performed for MRI stage, clinical stage, nodal status and pelvic structure involvement against disease-specific (DSS) and disease-free survival (DFS). RESULTS: MRI staging correlated with DSS (p=0.006) and DFS (p=0.007) but clinical staging did not. Pelvic nodes > or = 10 mm and juxtaregional or distant nodes > or = 8 mm short axis were most strongly associated with survival (p=0.014, p=0.011 and p=0.001, respectively, for association with DSS). Tumour involvement of pelvic bowel loops, pelvic sidewall and bladder mucosa were significantly associated with poor DSS and DFS (p<0.05). Tumour dimensions and bladder muscle involvement alone were not associated with poor survival. CONCLUSION: MRI staging is a better predictor of survival than clinical staging in patients receiving radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma. MRI assessment of lymph node enlargement and tumour involvement of pelvic structures gives valuable prognostic information.


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