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dc.contributor.authorTurner, Robert
dc.contributor.authorJones, Terry
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-27T11:47:19Z
dc.date.available2009-08-27T11:47:19Z
dc.date.issued2003
dc.identifier.citationTechniques for imaging neuroscience. 2003, 65:3-20 Br. Med. Bull.en
dc.identifier.issn0007-1420
dc.identifier.pmid12697613
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/bmb/ldg65.003
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/78884
dc.description.abstractIn the last 20 years, a number of non-invasive spatial mapping techniques have been demonstrated to provide powerful insights into the operation of the brain during task performance. These are, in order of their emergence as robust technologies: positron emission tomography, source localization with EEG and MEG, and functional magnetic resonance imaging. The imaging neuroscience study areas represented in this volume use the first or last of these - PET and fMRI. The physical principles underlying both of these techniques are outlined, and the important assumptions and limitations are made explicit. The range of applications for each is briefly indicated.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshBrain
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshImage Interpretation, Computer-Assisted
dc.subject.meshMagnetic Resonance Imaging
dc.subject.meshNeurosciences
dc.subject.meshTomography, Emission-Computed
dc.titleTechniques for imaging neuroscience.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentWellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, Institute of Neurology, University College London, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalBritish Medical Bulletinen
html.description.abstractIn the last 20 years, a number of non-invasive spatial mapping techniques have been demonstrated to provide powerful insights into the operation of the brain during task performance. These are, in order of their emergence as robust technologies: positron emission tomography, source localization with EEG and MEG, and functional magnetic resonance imaging. The imaging neuroscience study areas represented in this volume use the first or last of these - PET and fMRI. The physical principles underlying both of these techniques are outlined, and the important assumptions and limitations are made explicit. The range of applications for each is briefly indicated.


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