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dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Heather
dc.contributor.authorAddington-Hall, J M
dc.contributor.authorPeake, M D
dc.contributor.authorMcKendrik, J
dc.contributor.authorKeane, K
dc.contributor.authorThatcher, Nick
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-27T08:16:50Z
dc.date.available2009-08-27T08:16:50Z
dc.date.issued2003-12-15
dc.identifier.citationDomiciliary chemotherapy with gemcitabine is safe and acceptable to advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients: results of a feasibility study. 2003, 89 (12):2190-6 Br. J. Canceren
dc.identifier.issn0007-0920
dc.identifier.pmid14676793
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/sj.bjc.6601420
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/78793
dc.description.abstractA study was conducted to investigate the feasibility and acceptability of administering single-agent gemcitabine to patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in their own homes. Gemcitabine is an active agent in NSCLC with a good toxicity profile and lends itself to this type of investigation. A total of 24 patients were studied; as only one patient required gemcitabine to be changed from home administration to hospital administration, domiciliary gemcitabine is feasible. A total of 249 injections of gemcitabine were given, the mean number of courses being 3.5, range 1-6. The gemcitabine was given at 1000 mg m(-2) on days 1, 8 and 15, the courses being repeated every 28 days. All patients received their first course in hospital and in total 147 were given at home and only 14 in hospital on courses 2-6. Furthermore, both the patients and carers reported positively on the use of domiciliary gemcitabine and preferred it over hospital administration. There was no evidence of increasing burden to community services during the domiciliary chemotherapy. Further studies investigating this approach are warranted.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectLung Canceren
dc.subjectCancer Stagingen
dc.subject.meshAged
dc.subject.meshAntimetabolites, Antineoplastic
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung
dc.subject.meshDeoxycytidine
dc.subject.meshFeasibility Studies
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHome Care Services
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshLung Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Staging
dc.subject.meshQuality of Life
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome
dc.titleDomiciliary chemotherapy with gemcitabine is safe and acceptable to advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients: results of a feasibility study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medical Oncology, Wythenshawe Hospital, Manchester, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Canceren
html.description.abstractA study was conducted to investigate the feasibility and acceptability of administering single-agent gemcitabine to patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in their own homes. Gemcitabine is an active agent in NSCLC with a good toxicity profile and lends itself to this type of investigation. A total of 24 patients were studied; as only one patient required gemcitabine to be changed from home administration to hospital administration, domiciliary gemcitabine is feasible. A total of 249 injections of gemcitabine were given, the mean number of courses being 3.5, range 1-6. The gemcitabine was given at 1000 mg m(-2) on days 1, 8 and 15, the courses being repeated every 28 days. All patients received their first course in hospital and in total 147 were given at home and only 14 in hospital on courses 2-6. Furthermore, both the patients and carers reported positively on the use of domiciliary gemcitabine and preferred it over hospital administration. There was no evidence of increasing burden to community services during the domiciliary chemotherapy. Further studies investigating this approach are warranted.


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