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dc.contributor.authorStern, Peter L
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-24T16:18:52Z
dc.date.available2009-08-24T16:18:52Z
dc.date.issued2004-08
dc.identifier.citationRecent developments in human papillomavirus vaccines. 2004, 13 (8):959-71 Expert Opin Investig Drugsen
dc.identifier.issn1744-7658
dc.identifier.pmid15268634
dc.identifier.doi10.1517/13543784.13.8.959
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/78369
dc.description.abstractThe association of certain high-risk human papillomaviruses with the development of anogenital cancer in humans is well-established. Numerous preclinical studies have underwritten the development of both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine candidates for clinical evaluation. Prophylactic strategies are utilising virus-like particles composed of the L1 viral capsid protein to induce neutralising antibodies while therapeutic approaches are aimed at generating specific T cells targeted at the viral E6 and/or E7 oncogene products. Thus far, human papillomavirus virus-like particle vaccines have proven to be clinically efficacious in the early trials looking at the prevention of infection. Important future milestones will be showing the prevention of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and sufficient longevity for such protection. Different types of therapeutic vaccines including peptide, protein, DNA or viral vector-based vaccines have proven to be safe and immunogenic in patients, although there is often no correlation with clinical outcome. The possibility of combined prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines may offer the best chance for a significant reduction in the incidence of death from cervical cancer worldwide.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectDNA Tumour Virusesen
dc.subject.meshAnimals
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Viral
dc.subject.meshCapsid Proteins
dc.subject.meshDNA Tumor Viruses
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshPapillomaviridae
dc.subject.meshPapillomavirus Infections
dc.subject.meshPapillomavirus Vaccines
dc.subject.meshViral Vaccines
dc.titleRecent developments in human papillomavirus vaccines.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCancer Research UK Immunology Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, M20 4BX, UK. pstern@picr.man.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalExpert Opinion on Investigational Drugsen
html.description.abstractThe association of certain high-risk human papillomaviruses with the development of anogenital cancer in humans is well-established. Numerous preclinical studies have underwritten the development of both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine candidates for clinical evaluation. Prophylactic strategies are utilising virus-like particles composed of the L1 viral capsid protein to induce neutralising antibodies while therapeutic approaches are aimed at generating specific T cells targeted at the viral E6 and/or E7 oncogene products. Thus far, human papillomavirus virus-like particle vaccines have proven to be clinically efficacious in the early trials looking at the prevention of infection. Important future milestones will be showing the prevention of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and sufficient longevity for such protection. Different types of therapeutic vaccines including peptide, protein, DNA or viral vector-based vaccines have proven to be safe and immunogenic in patients, although there is often no correlation with clinical outcome. The possibility of combined prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines may offer the best chance for a significant reduction in the incidence of death from cervical cancer worldwide.


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