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dc.contributor.authorDermime, Said
dc.contributor.authorGilham, David E
dc.contributor.authorShaw, David M
dc.contributor.authorDavidson, Emma J
dc.contributor.authorMeziane, El-Kahina
dc.contributor.authorArmstrong, Anne C
dc.contributor.authorHawkins, Robert E
dc.contributor.authorStern, Peter L
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-24T14:08:30Z
dc.date.available2009-08-24T14:08:30Z
dc.date.issued2004-07-06
dc.identifier.citationVaccine and antibody-directed T cell tumour immunotherapy. 2004, 1704 (1):11-35 Biochim. Biophys. Actaen
dc.identifier.issn0006-3002
dc.identifier.pmid15238242
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bbcan.2004.03.002
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/78353
dc.description.abstractClearer evidence for immune surveillance in malignancy and the identification of many new tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) have driven novel vaccine and antibody-targeted responses for therapy in cancer. The exploitation of active immunisation may be particularly favourable for TAA where tolerance is incomplete but passive immunisation may offer an additional strategy where the immune repertoire is affected by either tolerance or immune suppression. This review will consider how to utilise both active and passive types of therapy delivered by T cells in the context of the failure of tumour-specific immunity by presenting cancer patients. This article will outline the progress, problems and prospects of several different vaccine and antibody-targeted approaches for immunotherapy of cancer where proof of principle pre-clinical studies have been or will soon be translated into the clinic. Two examples of vaccination-based therapies where both T cell- and antibody-mediated anti-tumour responses are likely to be relevant and two examples of oncofoetal antigen-specific antibody-directed T cell therapies are described in the following sections: (1) therapeutic vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) antigens in cervical neoplasia; (2) B cell lymphoma vaccines including against immunoglobulin idiotype; (3) oncofoetal antigens as tumour targets for redirecting T cells with antibody strategies.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectUterine Cervical Canceren
dc.subjectTumour Escapeen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subject.meshAnimals
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Anti-Idiotypic
dc.subject.meshAntigens, Neoplasm
dc.subject.meshAntigens, Viral
dc.subject.meshCancer Vaccines
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshImmunotherapy, Active
dc.subject.meshImmunotherapy, Adoptive
dc.subject.meshLymphoma
dc.subject.meshMice
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms
dc.subject.meshPapillomaviridae
dc.subject.meshT-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic
dc.subject.meshTumor Escape
dc.subject.meshUterine Cervical Neoplasms
dc.titleVaccine and antibody-directed T cell tumour immunotherapy.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentImmunology, Cancer Research UK Groups, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research and University of Manchester, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester M20 4BX, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalBiochimica et Biophysica Actaen
html.description.abstractClearer evidence for immune surveillance in malignancy and the identification of many new tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) have driven novel vaccine and antibody-targeted responses for therapy in cancer. The exploitation of active immunisation may be particularly favourable for TAA where tolerance is incomplete but passive immunisation may offer an additional strategy where the immune repertoire is affected by either tolerance or immune suppression. This review will consider how to utilise both active and passive types of therapy delivered by T cells in the context of the failure of tumour-specific immunity by presenting cancer patients. This article will outline the progress, problems and prospects of several different vaccine and antibody-targeted approaches for immunotherapy of cancer where proof of principle pre-clinical studies have been or will soon be translated into the clinic. Two examples of vaccination-based therapies where both T cell- and antibody-mediated anti-tumour responses are likely to be relevant and two examples of oncofoetal antigen-specific antibody-directed T cell therapies are described in the following sections: (1) therapeutic vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) antigens in cervical neoplasia; (2) B cell lymphoma vaccines including against immunoglobulin idiotype; (3) oncofoetal antigens as tumour targets for redirecting T cells with antibody strategies.


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