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dc.contributor.authorClarke, Robert B
dc.contributor.authorAnderson, Elizabeth
dc.contributor.authorHowell, Anthony
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-21T09:53:09Z
dc.date.available2009-08-21T09:53:09Z
dc.date.issued2004-09
dc.identifier.citationSteroid receptors in human breast cancer. 2004, 15 (7):316-23 Trends Endocrinol. Metab.en
dc.identifier.issn1043-2760
dc.identifier.pmid15350603
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.tem.2004.07.004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/78107
dc.description.abstractOvarian steroids, acting through nuclear receptors, are crucial players in normal breast development and cancer. Estrogen, in particular, is the focus of breast cancer therapies because tumours are often dependent on this steroid for growth. Recently, novel genes and/or protein isoforms of receptors for both estrogen and progesterone have been discovered, leading us to reappraise their roles in breast development and cancer. Recognition of changes in estrogen receptor biology that occur in the transition from normal development to cancer has emphasized its contribution to tumorigenesis. In addition, complex interactions with other signalling pathways, particularly growth factor pathways, have recently come to the forefront. These interactions might explain resistance to endocrine treatments and offer solutions in terms of novel therapeutic targets.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectBreast Canceren
dc.subject.meshBreast Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshCues
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshOvary
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Steroid
dc.titleSteroid receptors in human breast cancer.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCR-UK Department of Medical Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK. rclarke@picr.man.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalTrends in Endocrinology and Metabolismen
html.description.abstractOvarian steroids, acting through nuclear receptors, are crucial players in normal breast development and cancer. Estrogen, in particular, is the focus of breast cancer therapies because tumours are often dependent on this steroid for growth. Recently, novel genes and/or protein isoforms of receptors for both estrogen and progesterone have been discovered, leading us to reappraise their roles in breast development and cancer. Recognition of changes in estrogen receptor biology that occur in the transition from normal development to cancer has emphasized its contribution to tumorigenesis. In addition, complex interactions with other signalling pathways, particularly growth factor pathways, have recently come to the forefront. These interactions might explain resistance to endocrine treatments and offer solutions in terms of novel therapeutic targets.


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