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dc.contributor.authorMangar, Stephen A
dc.contributor.authorLogue, John P
dc.contributor.authorShanks, Jonathan H
dc.contributor.authorCooper, Rachel A
dc.contributor.authorCowan, Richard A
dc.contributor.authorWylie, James P
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-20T11:43:56Z
dc.date.available2009-08-20T11:43:56Z
dc.date.issued2004-12
dc.identifier.citationSmall-cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: 10-year experience. 2004, 16 (8):523-7 Clin Oncol (R Coll Radiol)en
dc.identifier.issn0936-6555
dc.identifier.pmid15630844
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/78005
dc.description.abstractAIMS: Small-cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is rarely encountered in clinical practice. We report on our clinical experience with affected patients presenting to our institution from 1986 to 1996. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively analysed 14 pathologically confirmed cases, specifically looking at stage, presenting features, treatment and overall survival. The median age at presentation was 74 years (range 54-91 years). RESULTS: Ten patients presented with stage III disease, and four patients with stage IV disease (1 = nodal, 3 = distant metastases). Four patients were treated with radical radiotherapy (one patient receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy) and two underwent a radical cystoprostatectomy. Five patients received palliative bladder radiotherapy and three were too frail for treatment at presentation. The overall median survival was 5 months. Patients receiving radical treatment had a median overall survival of 21 months, with only one long-term survivor. CONCLUSION: This highly aggressive tumour tends to affect an elderly population who are generally frail and have significant comorbidity. Many are unfit for radical treatment. In patients with disease confined to the pelvis who are able to tolerate radical intervention, the results of local therapy alone are poor. It therefore remains incumbent on treating clinicians to explore means of improving these results. Initial chemotherapy analogous to small-cell lung cancer may offer a durable response with a better chance for long-term survival.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCancer Stagingen
dc.subjectUrinary Bladder Canceren
dc.subject.meshAged
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and over
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma, Small Cell
dc.subject.meshCombined Modality Therapy
dc.subject.meshCystectomy
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshNeoadjuvant Therapy
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Staging
dc.subject.meshPrognosis
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies
dc.subject.meshSurvival Analysis
dc.subject.meshUrinary Bladder Neoplasms
dc.titleSmall-cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder: 10-year experience.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Clinical Oncology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK. stephenmangar@supaworld.comen
dc.identifier.journalClinical Oncologyen
html.description.abstractAIMS: Small-cell carcinoma of the urinary bladder is rarely encountered in clinical practice. We report on our clinical experience with affected patients presenting to our institution from 1986 to 1996. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively analysed 14 pathologically confirmed cases, specifically looking at stage, presenting features, treatment and overall survival. The median age at presentation was 74 years (range 54-91 years). RESULTS: Ten patients presented with stage III disease, and four patients with stage IV disease (1 = nodal, 3 = distant metastases). Four patients were treated with radical radiotherapy (one patient receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy) and two underwent a radical cystoprostatectomy. Five patients received palliative bladder radiotherapy and three were too frail for treatment at presentation. The overall median survival was 5 months. Patients receiving radical treatment had a median overall survival of 21 months, with only one long-term survivor. CONCLUSION: This highly aggressive tumour tends to affect an elderly population who are generally frail and have significant comorbidity. Many are unfit for radical treatment. In patients with disease confined to the pelvis who are able to tolerate radical intervention, the results of local therapy alone are poor. It therefore remains incumbent on treating clinicians to explore means of improving these results. Initial chemotherapy analogous to small-cell lung cancer may offer a durable response with a better chance for long-term survival.


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