Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMoore, Christopher J
dc.contributor.authorShalet, Stephen M
dc.contributor.authorManickam, Kathiresan
dc.contributor.authorWillard, Terry
dc.contributor.authorMaheshwari, Hiralal G
dc.contributor.authorBaumann, Gerhard
dc.date.accessioned2009-08-06T14:15:55Z
dc.date.available2009-08-06T14:15:55Z
dc.date.issued2005-07
dc.identifier.citationVoice abnormality in adults with congenital and adult-acquired growth hormone deficiency. 2005, 90 (7):4128-32 J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.en
dc.identifier.issn0021-972X
dc.identifier.pmid15870127
dc.identifier.doi10.1210/jc.2004-2558
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/76523
dc.description.abstractCONTEXT: Adult males with congenital, untreated, severe GH deficiency (GHD) due to genetic GHRH receptor deficiency exhibit distinctive, high-pitched, and raspy voice characteristics. OBJECTIVE/DESIGN: To determine the physical underpinning of this phenomenon, we performed voice recordings, translarynx impedance measurements, spectral analysis, and estimates of spectral complexity [approximate entropy (ApEn)] in four affected men. Results were compared with those obtained in four men with untreated adult-onset GHD and a normal male population. RESULTS: Congenital GHD subjects had a high-pitched voice with a fundamental frequency typical of normal females (174-266 Hz). Their frequency spectra were characterized by abnormal harmonics, with reversal/interruption of the normal amplitude decay among higher-order harmonics, findings consistent with a creaky quality of the voice. Patients with adult-onset GHD, acquired at ages 31, 38, and 40 yr, had a normal male pitch (fundamental frequency, 117-154 Hz) but pathologically low ApEn values, corresponding to a breathy quality of the voice and suggesting abnormal vocal fold function. A fourth patient who acquired GHD at age 22 yr had a pitch intermediate between male and female, high ApEn, and a spectral pattern similar to the congenital GHD patients. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates an effect of GH on laryngeal size and vocal fold compliance that results in a high pitch and disordered spectral quality. The time of onset of GHD determines which type of abnormality predominates.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshHuman Growth Hormone
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshMutation
dc.subject.meshReceptors, Somatotropin
dc.subject.meshVoice Disorders
dc.titleVoice abnormality in adults with congenital and adult-acquired growth hormone deficiency.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNorth Western Medical Physics, Christie Hospital, Manchester, United Kingdom. chris.moore@physics.cr.man.ac.uken
dc.identifier.journalThe Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolismen
html.description.abstractCONTEXT: Adult males with congenital, untreated, severe GH deficiency (GHD) due to genetic GHRH receptor deficiency exhibit distinctive, high-pitched, and raspy voice characteristics. OBJECTIVE/DESIGN: To determine the physical underpinning of this phenomenon, we performed voice recordings, translarynx impedance measurements, spectral analysis, and estimates of spectral complexity [approximate entropy (ApEn)] in four affected men. Results were compared with those obtained in four men with untreated adult-onset GHD and a normal male population. RESULTS: Congenital GHD subjects had a high-pitched voice with a fundamental frequency typical of normal females (174-266 Hz). Their frequency spectra were characterized by abnormal harmonics, with reversal/interruption of the normal amplitude decay among higher-order harmonics, findings consistent with a creaky quality of the voice. Patients with adult-onset GHD, acquired at ages 31, 38, and 40 yr, had a normal male pitch (fundamental frequency, 117-154 Hz) but pathologically low ApEn values, corresponding to a breathy quality of the voice and suggesting abnormal vocal fold function. A fourth patient who acquired GHD at age 22 yr had a pitch intermediate between male and female, high ApEn, and a spectral pattern similar to the congenital GHD patients. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates an effect of GH on laryngeal size and vocal fold compliance that results in a high pitch and disordered spectral quality. The time of onset of GHD determines which type of abnormality predominates.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record