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dc.contributor.authorBlackhall, Fiona H
dc.contributor.authorBhosle, Jaishree
dc.contributor.authorThatcher, Nick
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-29T12:23:48Z
dc.date.available2009-07-29T12:23:48Z
dc.date.issued2005-03
dc.identifier.citationChemotherapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients with performance status 2. 2005, 17 (2):135-9 Curr Opin Oncolen
dc.identifier.issn1040-8746
dc.identifier.pmid15725918
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/75828
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE OF REVIEW: A beneficial role for palliative chemotherapy in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer and a good performance status (ECOG 0 or 1) is now well established. In this article, we focus on the available literature for patients with a PS of 2, in whom a role for chemotherapy has yet to be defined. RECENT FINDINGS: In the past, the results of randomized trials of comparative standard platinum-based combination chemotherapy regimens have demonstrated inferior survival rates in PS 2 patients compared with those with PS 0 or 1. Consequently, a general view has emerged that the side effects of treatment outweigh the benefits, and chemotherapy has not been recommended as a standard of care. Although few studies have been designed specifically for PS 2 patients, gemcitabine, vinorelbine or taxane monotherapy, dose-attenuated platinum combination regimens, and epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors may provide a clinical benefit with less toxicity. For example, although the median survival of PS 2 patients treated with best supportive care is 2-3 months, chemotherapy regimens are associated with median survivals ranging from 4 to 6 months. These data provide encouragement to revisit the role of chemotherapy in this group of patients. SUMMARY: There is potential with cytotoxic treatment to improve the palliative options for PS 2 patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Further trials designed specifically for PS 2 patients that include measurement of symptoms, quality of life, and survival and toxicity are required to define the most active but least toxic regimens.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectLung Canceren
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Agents
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung
dc.subject.meshChemotherapy, Adjuvant
dc.subject.meshEpidermal Growth Factor
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshLung Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshProtein Kinase Inhibitors
dc.subject.meshReceptor, Epidermal Growth Factor
dc.titleChemotherapy for advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients with performance status 2.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medical Oncology, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, UK. Fiona.Blackhall@christie-tr.nwest.nhs.uken
dc.identifier.journalCurrent Opinion in Oncologyen
html.description.abstractPURPOSE OF REVIEW: A beneficial role for palliative chemotherapy in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer and a good performance status (ECOG 0 or 1) is now well established. In this article, we focus on the available literature for patients with a PS of 2, in whom a role for chemotherapy has yet to be defined. RECENT FINDINGS: In the past, the results of randomized trials of comparative standard platinum-based combination chemotherapy regimens have demonstrated inferior survival rates in PS 2 patients compared with those with PS 0 or 1. Consequently, a general view has emerged that the side effects of treatment outweigh the benefits, and chemotherapy has not been recommended as a standard of care. Although few studies have been designed specifically for PS 2 patients, gemcitabine, vinorelbine or taxane monotherapy, dose-attenuated platinum combination regimens, and epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors may provide a clinical benefit with less toxicity. For example, although the median survival of PS 2 patients treated with best supportive care is 2-3 months, chemotherapy regimens are associated with median survivals ranging from 4 to 6 months. These data provide encouragement to revisit the role of chemotherapy in this group of patients. SUMMARY: There is potential with cytotoxic treatment to improve the palliative options for PS 2 patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer. Further trials designed specifically for PS 2 patients that include measurement of symptoms, quality of life, and survival and toxicity are required to define the most active but least toxic regimens.


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