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dc.contributor.authorHorsman, Michael R
dc.contributor.authorBohm, Lothar
dc.contributor.authorMargison, Geoffrey P
dc.contributor.authorMilas, Luka
dc.contributor.authorRosier, Jean-Francois
dc.contributor.authorSafrany, Geza
dc.contributor.authorSelzer, Edgar
dc.contributor.authorVerheij, Marcel
dc.contributor.authorHendry, Jolyon H
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-07T10:58:56Z
dc.date.available2009-07-07T10:58:56Z
dc.date.issued2006-02-01
dc.identifier.citationTumor radiosensitizers--current status of development of various approaches: report of an International Atomic Energy Agency meeting. 2006, 64 (2):551-61 Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.en
dc.identifier.issn0360-3016
dc.identifier.pmid16414371
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijrobp.2005.09.032
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/72690
dc.description.abstractPURPOSE: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) held a Technical Meeting of Consultants to (1) discuss a selection of relatively new agents, not those well-established in clinical practice, that operated through a variety of mechanisms to sensitize tumors to radiation and (2) to compare and contrast their tumor efficacy, normal tissue toxicity, and status of development regarding clinical application. The aim was to advise the IAEA as to which developing agent or class of agents would be worth promoting further, by supporting additional laboratory research or clinical trials, with the eventual goal of improving cancer control rates using radiotherapy, in developing countries in particular. RESULTS: The agents under discussion included a wide, but not complete, range of different types of drugs, and antibodies that interfered with molecules in cell signaling pathways. These were contrasted with new molecular antisense and gene therapy strategies. All the drugs discussed have previously been shown to act as tumor cell radiosensitizers or to kill hypoxic cells present in tumors. CONCLUSION: Specific recommendations were made for more preclinical studies with certain of the agents and for clinical trials that would be suitable for industrialized countries, as well as trials that were considered more appropriate for developing countries.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subject.meshAngiogenesis Inhibitors
dc.subject.meshApoptosis
dc.subject.meshCell Hypoxia
dc.subject.meshCyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors
dc.subject.meshGene Therapy
dc.subject.meshInternational Agencies
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms
dc.subject.meshOligoribonucleotides, Antisense
dc.subject.meshRadiation-Sensitizing Agents
dc.subject.meshReceptor, Epidermal Growth Factor
dc.titleTumor radiosensitizers--current status of development of various approaches: report of an International Atomic Energy Agency meeting.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Experimental Clinical Oncology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark.en
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physicsen
html.description.abstractPURPOSE: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) held a Technical Meeting of Consultants to (1) discuss a selection of relatively new agents, not those well-established in clinical practice, that operated through a variety of mechanisms to sensitize tumors to radiation and (2) to compare and contrast their tumor efficacy, normal tissue toxicity, and status of development regarding clinical application. The aim was to advise the IAEA as to which developing agent or class of agents would be worth promoting further, by supporting additional laboratory research or clinical trials, with the eventual goal of improving cancer control rates using radiotherapy, in developing countries in particular. RESULTS: The agents under discussion included a wide, but not complete, range of different types of drugs, and antibodies that interfered with molecules in cell signaling pathways. These were contrasted with new molecular antisense and gene therapy strategies. All the drugs discussed have previously been shown to act as tumor cell radiosensitizers or to kill hypoxic cells present in tumors. CONCLUSION: Specific recommendations were made for more preclinical studies with certain of the agents and for clinical trials that would be suitable for industrialized countries, as well as trials that were considered more appropriate for developing countries.


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