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dc.contributor.authorSaunders, Mark P
dc.contributor.authorIveson, T
dc.date.accessioned2009-07-06T12:07:30Z
dc.date.available2009-07-06T12:07:30Z
dc.date.issued2006-07-17
dc.identifier.citationManagement of advanced colorectal cancer: state of the art. 2006, 95 (2):131-8 Br. J. Canceren
dc.identifier.issn0007-0920
dc.identifier.pmid16835584
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/sj.bjc.6603233
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/72581
dc.description.abstractColorectal cancer (CRC) caused over 500 000 deaths worldwide in 2002. Recent advances in the treatment of advanced disease include the incorporation of two new cytotoxic agents, irinotecan and oxaliplatin, into first-line regimens. The concept of planned sequential therapy involving three active agents during the course of a patient's treatment is evolving. Coupled with the integrated use of targeted monoclonal antibodies, we can now expect overall survival rates for advanced disease to exceed 20 months. This review considers current treatments and suggests where future progress may occur.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectColorectal Canceren
dc.subject.meshAntineoplastic Agents
dc.subject.meshColorectal Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshDisease Progression
dc.subject.meshDrug Therapy, Combination
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshSurvival Rate
dc.titleManagement of advanced colorectal cancer: state of the art.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentChristie Hospital NHS Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester M20 4BX, UK. mark.saunders@christie-tr.nwest.nhs.uken
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Canceren
html.description.abstractColorectal cancer (CRC) caused over 500 000 deaths worldwide in 2002. Recent advances in the treatment of advanced disease include the incorporation of two new cytotoxic agents, irinotecan and oxaliplatin, into first-line regimens. The concept of planned sequential therapy involving three active agents during the course of a patient's treatment is evolving. Coupled with the integrated use of targeted monoclonal antibodies, we can now expect overall survival rates for advanced disease to exceed 20 months. This review considers current treatments and suggests where future progress may occur.


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