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dc.contributor.authorWilson, Malcolm S
dc.date.accessioned2009-06-11T11:23:51Z
dc.date.available2009-06-11T11:23:51Z
dc.date.issued2007-10
dc.identifier.citationPracticalities and costs of adhesions. 2007, 9 Suppl 2:60-5 Colorectal Disen
dc.identifier.issn1462-8910
dc.identifier.pmid17824972
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1463-1318.2007.01360.x
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/70161
dc.description.abstractIn spite of postoperative adhesions being common there appears to be a reluctance to use anti-adhesion products routinely. This article compares the incidence of adhesions with other conditions in order to identify the level of risk. The health economics surrounding adhesion-related disease are described. This combined information may be of help to convince health practitioners of the need to take a more active role in adhesion prevention. The SCAR project has identified the risk of adhesion-related disease. This is compared with published risks of other common clinical situations. An economic model first described by the author in 2002 has been revised with 2006 costs [1]. The SCAR data demonstrates a directly related risk of re-admission in certain groups of 9.4% over 5 years [2]. The frequency of including this fact in the consenting process is low (<15%) [3]. Legal precedent has identified a risk of >2% warrants inclusion in the consent process; failure to do so could be considered negligent [4]. Use of an anti-adhesion product with a cost of 130 euros with an efficacy of 25% in 1 year in the UK could save over 40 million euros over a 10-year period. Adhesion risk is frequent enough to include in consent. Failure to do this and avoidance of treatment, which may reduce adhesions will have major financial consequences on healthcare systems.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.meshAbdomen
dc.subject.meshCost of Illness
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshPostoperative Complications
dc.subject.meshRandomized Controlled Trials as Topic
dc.subject.meshTissue Adhesions
dc.titlePracticalities and costs of adhesions.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, Christie Hospital, Manchester, UK. malcolm.wilson@christie.nhs.uken
dc.identifier.journalColorectal Diseaseen
html.description.abstractIn spite of postoperative adhesions being common there appears to be a reluctance to use anti-adhesion products routinely. This article compares the incidence of adhesions with other conditions in order to identify the level of risk. The health economics surrounding adhesion-related disease are described. This combined information may be of help to convince health practitioners of the need to take a more active role in adhesion prevention. The SCAR project has identified the risk of adhesion-related disease. This is compared with published risks of other common clinical situations. An economic model first described by the author in 2002 has been revised with 2006 costs [1]. The SCAR data demonstrates a directly related risk of re-admission in certain groups of 9.4% over 5 years [2]. The frequency of including this fact in the consenting process is low (<15%) [3]. Legal precedent has identified a risk of >2% warrants inclusion in the consent process; failure to do so could be considered negligent [4]. Use of an anti-adhesion product with a cost of 130 euros with an efficacy of 25% in 1 year in the UK could save over 40 million euros over a 10-year period. Adhesion risk is frequent enough to include in consent. Failure to do this and avoidance of treatment, which may reduce adhesions will have major financial consequences on healthcare systems.


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