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dc.contributor.authorStringer, Jacqui
dc.contributor.authorSwindell, Ric
dc.contributor.authorDennis, Michael
dc.date.accessioned2009-05-13T16:19:52Z
dc.date.available2009-05-13T16:19:52Z
dc.date.issued2008-10
dc.identifier.citationMassage in patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy reduces serum cortisol and prolactin. 2008, 17 (10):1024-31 Psychooncologyen
dc.identifier.issn1099-1611
dc.identifier.pmid18300336
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/pon.1331
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/68041
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: The objective is to identify whether single 20 min massage sessions were safe and effective in reducing stress levels of isolated haematological oncology patients. DESIGN: Based on a randomised controlled trial, 39 patients were randomised to aromatherapy, massage or rest (control) arm. MEASURES: The measures were serum cortisol and prolactin levels, quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30) and semi-structured interviews. Primary outcome measure was the fall in serum cortisol levels. RESULTS: A significant difference was seen between arms in cortisol (P=0.002) and prolactin (p=0.031) levels from baseline to 30 min post-session. Aromatherapy and massage arms showed a significantly greater drop in cortisol than the rest arm. Only the massage arm had a significantly greater reduction in prolactin then the rest arm. The EORTC QLQ-C30 showed a significant reduction in 'need for rest' for patients in both experimental arms compared with the control arm, whereas the semi-structured interviews identified a universal feeling of relaxation in patients in the experimental arms. CONCLUSION: This pilot study demonstrated that in isolated haematological oncology patients, a significant reduction in cortisol could be safely achieved through massage, with associated improvement in psychological well-being. The implications are discussed.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCanceren
dc.subjectOncologyen
dc.subjectCortisolen
dc.subjectStressen
dc.subject.meshAromatherapy
dc.subject.meshFemale
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshHydrocortisone
dc.subject.meshLeukemia
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMassage
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshPilot Projects
dc.subject.meshProlactin
dc.subject.meshQuality of Life
dc.subject.meshQuestionnaires
dc.subject.meshRest
dc.titleMassage in patients undergoing intensive chemotherapy reduces serum cortisol and prolactin.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentHaematology and Transplant Unit, Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. jacqui.stringer@christie.nhs.uken
dc.identifier.journalPsycho-Oncologyen
html.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: The objective is to identify whether single 20 min massage sessions were safe and effective in reducing stress levels of isolated haematological oncology patients. DESIGN: Based on a randomised controlled trial, 39 patients were randomised to aromatherapy, massage or rest (control) arm. MEASURES: The measures were serum cortisol and prolactin levels, quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30) and semi-structured interviews. Primary outcome measure was the fall in serum cortisol levels. RESULTS: A significant difference was seen between arms in cortisol (P=0.002) and prolactin (p=0.031) levels from baseline to 30 min post-session. Aromatherapy and massage arms showed a significantly greater drop in cortisol than the rest arm. Only the massage arm had a significantly greater reduction in prolactin then the rest arm. The EORTC QLQ-C30 showed a significant reduction in 'need for rest' for patients in both experimental arms compared with the control arm, whereas the semi-structured interviews identified a universal feeling of relaxation in patients in the experimental arms. CONCLUSION: This pilot study demonstrated that in isolated haematological oncology patients, a significant reduction in cortisol could be safely achieved through massage, with associated improvement in psychological well-being. The implications are discussed.


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