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dc.contributor.authorCockburn, K. C.
dc.contributor.authorToumi, Z.
dc.contributor.authorMackie, A.
dc.contributor.authorJulyan, Peter J
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-30T11:56:03Z
dc.date.available2021-09-30T11:56:03Z
dc.date.issued2021en
dc.identifier.citationCockburn KC, Toumi Z, Mackie A, Julyan P. Radioguided Surgery for Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumours: a Systematic Literature Review. J Gastrointest Surg. 2021 Sep 10.en
dc.identifier.pmid34506015en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11605-021-05115-wen
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/624605
dc.description.abstractBackground: Radioguided surgery (RGS) for gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours (GEP-NETs) has been suggested as a way to improve intraoperative lesion detection. This systematic literature review of reports of the use of RGS for GEP-NETs was performed to determine if there is a benefit. Methods: A literature search was conducted using Google Scholar and PubMed, and snowballing from any relevant literature. Full-text studies were included if they were published in the English language and reported outcomes of RGS on human subjects with GEP-NETs. Qualitative data synthesis was performed. Results: Twenty-six papers including a total of 209 patients were included. The tracers used were predominantly indium-111 pentetreotide, gallium-68 DOTA-peptides, and technetium-99m EDDA/HYNIC-peptides. Heterogeneous protocols make comparisons difficult, but most papers reported a benefit from the use of RGS in tumours in the gastrointestinal tract; utility in localisation of pancreatic tumours was less clear. Time between tracer administration and operation varied: from 16 h to 8 days with indium-111, 0-24 h with technetium-99m, and 19-193 min with gallium-68. Eight teams reported the thresholding technique used for discrimination-four used a ratio, four statistical methods, and one looked at the sensitivity and specificity of different cut-offs. Six teams performed follow-up of 24 patients (three pancreas, eight gastrinoma, 13 gastrointestinal tract) for between 3 months and 3 years. Two patients relapsed (one pancreas, one gastrinoma) between 6 and 12 months post-surgery. Conclusions: RGS appears to aid in localisation of gastrointestinal NETs, but the benefit is more equivocal in pancreatic NETs. Further work into outcomes is warranted.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttps://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11605-021-05115-wen
dc.titleRadioguided surgery for gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumours: a systematic literature reviewen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNorthern Medical Physics and Clinical Engineering, County Durham and Darlington NHS Foundation Trust, Hollyhurst Road, Darlington, DL3 6HX, UK.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Gastrointestinal Surgeryen
dc.description.noteen]
refterms.dateFOA2021-10-13T08:23:36Z


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