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dc.contributor.authorStorey, L.
dc.contributor.authorAbdul-Latif, M.
dc.contributor.authorKreft, S.
dc.contributor.authorBarrett, E.
dc.contributor.authorPickering, L. M.
dc.contributor.authorRohaan, M. W.
dc.contributor.authorAhmed, S.
dc.contributor.authorEigentler, T. K.
dc.contributor.authorHassel, J. C.
dc.contributor.authorHaferkamp, S.
dc.contributor.authorMeiss, F.
dc.contributor.authorSteeb, T.
dc.contributor.authorShaw, H. M.
dc.contributor.authorBlank, C. U.
dc.contributor.authorVan Akkooi, A. C. J.
dc.contributor.authorLarkin, J. M. G.
dc.contributor.authorSchilling, B.
dc.contributor.authorLorigan, Paul C
dc.contributor.authorNathan, P. D.
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-16T07:49:17Z
dc.date.available2020-11-16T07:49:17Z
dc.date.issued2020en
dc.identifier.citationStorey L, Abdul-Latif M, Kreft S, Barrett E, Pickering LM, Rohaan MW, et al. Checkpoint inhibitor treatment in patients with isolated in-transit melanoma metastases. Journal of Clinical Oncology. 2020;38(15)en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/623438
dc.description.abstractBackground: In the context of multiple in-transit melanoma metastases without nodal involvement, a variety of treatment modalities have historically been employed including surgery, laser, isolated limb perfusion/infusion, intralesional interleukin-2, T-VEC and electrochemotherapy. Unfortunately, most patients treated with these modalities experience subsequent disease progression. While checkpoint inhibitors (CPI) are a standard of care for bulky unresectable stage III and for stage IV melanoma, patients with isolated in-transit metastases were rarely included in registration studies. There are anecdotal reports of lower response rates in these patients despite them having disease characteristics that would usually be associated with a good response. Methods: We report data from 11 retrospective patient cohorts treated at cancer centres across Europe who received CPI between 2016 and April 2019. All patients had multiple in-transit metastases without clinical or radiological evidence of nodal or distant disease. Disease response was assessed using CT, PET-CT or MRI depending on clinical indication. All patients had at least one prior resection of loco-regional relapsed disease and were deemed not curable by further surgery. Results: Sixty three patients meeting criteria were identified, 40 females and 23 males. Median age was 72 years and 54 (86%) patients had a normal lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). 19 (30%) patients had a BRAF mutation. At treatment initiation, the majority 55 (87.3%) received single agent PD-1 inhibitor, 7 (11.1%) combination ipilimumab + nivolumab and 1 (1.6%) received single agent anti-CTLA 4. The overall response rate was 62% for the full population. The response rate with anti-PD1 monotherapy was 59%. With a median FU of 23 months, the median PFS was 26 months, median OS not reached. OS estimates with 95% CI: 12 month - 93% (87-100%), 24 month - 88% (80-98%), 36 month - 80% (67-95%). Conclusions: The results show a high response rate to CPI in patients with in-transit metastases and support early treatment with CPI following identification of in-transit metastases not curable with surgery whilst disease characteristics remain favourable.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleCheckpoint inhibitor treatment in patients with isolated in-transit melanoma metastasesen
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedingsen
dc.contributor.departmentChristie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchesteren
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Clinical Oncologyen
dc.description.noteen]


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