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dc.contributor.authorGreen, Adèle C
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-06T13:33:48Z
dc.date.available2020-10-06T13:33:48Z
dc.date.issued2020en
dc.identifier.citationGreen AC. Regular application of sunscreen can prevent skin cancer. Journal of Cosmetic Science. 2020;71(4):191-6.en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/623341
dc.description.abstractThis review summarizes the evidence on the protection against skin cancer afforded by sunscreen.Solid evidence can come only from randomized controlled trials, despite a multitude of case–control and cohort studies that have addressed the issue, because observational evidence is intractably confounded since those at highest risk of skin cancer are naturally the highest users of sunscreen. of the single human trial conducted in subtropical Australia during 1992–1996 with follow-up to 2014 showed that the application of a broad-spectrum, sun protection factor 16 sunscreen to exposed skin of the head and neck and upper limbs at least 3–4 days per week in adulthood can reduce the risk of developing cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma but does not appear to reduce the risk of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) overall, although it may reduce the occurrence of multiple BCCs over timeen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.titleRegular application of sunscreen can prevent skin canceren
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPopulation Studies Department, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, 4006 Australia, CRUK Manchester Institute and Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Manchester, M13 9PL United Kingdom (A.C.G.)en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Cosmetic Scienceen
dc.description.noteen]


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