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dc.contributor.authorDillon, R
dc.contributor.authorHills, RK
dc.contributor.authorFreeman, SD
dc.contributor.authorPotter, N
dc.contributor.authorJovanovic, J
dc.contributor.authorIvey, A
dc.contributor.authorKanda, AS
dc.contributor.authorRunglall, M
dc.contributor.authorFoot, N
dc.contributor.authorValganon, M
dc.contributor.authorKhwaja, A
dc.contributor.authorCavenagh, J
dc.contributor.authorSmith, ML
dc.contributor.authorOmmen, HB
dc.contributor.authorOvergaard, U
dc.contributor.authorDennis, Michael
dc.contributor.authorKnapper, S
dc.contributor.authorKaur, H
dc.contributor.authorTaussig, DC
dc.contributor.authorMehta, P
dc.contributor.authorRaj, K
dc.contributor.authorNovitzky-Basso, I
dc.contributor.authorNikolousis, E
dc.contributor.authorDanby, RD
dc.contributor.authorKrishnamurthy, P
dc.contributor.authorHill, K
dc.contributor.authorFinnegan, D
dc.contributor.authorAlimam, S
dc.contributor.authorHurst, E
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, P
dc.contributor.authorKhan, AB
dc.contributor.authorSalim, R
dc.contributor.authorCraddock, CF
dc.contributor.authorSpearing, RL
dc.contributor.authorGilkes, AF
dc.contributor.authorGale, RE
dc.contributor.authorBurnett, AK
dc.contributor.authorRussell, NH
dc.contributor.authorGrimwade, D
dc.date.accessioned2020-02-27T16:55:21Z
dc.date.available2020-02-27T16:55:21Z
dc.date.issued2020en
dc.identifier.citationDillon R, Hills RK, Freeman SD, Potter N, Jovanovic J, Ivey A, et al. Molecular MRD status and outcome after transplantation in NPM1 mutated AML: results from the UK NCRI AML17 study. Blood. 2020.en
dc.identifier.pmid31932839en
dc.identifier.doi10.1182/blood.2019002959en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/622748
dc.description.abstractRelapse remains the most common cause of treatment failure for patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) who undergo allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) and carries a grave prognosis. Multiple studies have identified the presence of measurable residual disease (MRD) assessed by flow cytometry (FCM) prior to alloSCT as a strong predictor of relapse, but it is not clear how these findings apply to patients who test positive in molecular MRD assays which have far greater sensitivity. We analysed pre-transplant blood and bone marrow samples by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) in 107 patients with NPM1 mutant AML enrolled in the UK National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) AML17 study. After a median follow-up of 4.9 years, patients with negative, low (<200 copies / 105 ABL in the PB and <1000 copies in the BM) and high levels of MRD had an estimated 2y overall survival (OS) of 83%, 63% and 13% respectively (p<0.0001). Focussing on patients with low level MRD prior to alloSCT, those with FLT3 ITD had significantly poorer outcome (hazard ratio, HR, 6.14, p=0.01). Combining these variables was highly prognostic, dividing patients into two groups with 2y OS of 17% and 82% (HR 13.2, p<0.0001). T-depletion was associated with significantly reduced survival both in the entire cohort (2y OS 56% vs 96%, HR 3.24, p=0.0005) and in MRD positive patients (2y OS 34% vs 100%, HR 3.78, p=0.003) but there was no significant effect of either conditioning regimen or donor source on outcome. Registered at ISRCTN (http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN55675535).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttps://dx.doi.org/10.1182/blood.2019002959en
dc.titleMolecular MRD status and outcome after transplantation in NPM1 mutated AML: results from the UK NCRI AML17 studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentKing's College London, London, United Kingdomen
dc.identifier.journalBlooden
dc.description.noteen]


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