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dc.contributor.authorWay, M
dc.contributor.authorMarquart, L
dc.contributor.authorChambers, DC
dc.contributor.authorHopkins, P
dc.contributor.authorMiura, K
dc.contributor.authorJiyad, Z
dc.contributor.authorPlasmeijer, EI
dc.contributor.authorFerguson, LE
dc.contributor.authorDavis, M
dc.contributor.authorWhiteman, DC
dc.contributor.authorSoyer, HP
dc.contributor.authorO'Rourke, P
dc.contributor.authorGreen, Adèle C
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-29T15:18:00Z
dc.date.available2020-01-29T15:18:00Z
dc.date.issued2019en
dc.identifier.citationWay M, Marquart L, Chambers DC, Hopkins P, Miura K, Jiyad Z, et al. Skin cancer multiplicity in lung transplant recipients: prospective, population-based study. Br J Dermatol. 2019.en
dc.identifier.pmid31853948en
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/bjd.18812en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/622736
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Lung transplant recipients are at high risk of skin cancer but precise annual incidence rates of treated skin cancers per patient are unknown. OBJECTIVES: To prospectively assess the total burden of histologically confirmed squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and associated factors in lung transplant recipients. METHODS: A population-based cohort of 125 Queensland lung transplant recipients aged 18 years and over, recruited 2013 - 2015, were followed to the end of 2016. All underwent dermatologic skin examinations at baseline and annually thereafter and patients self-reported all interim treated skin cancers which were verified against pathology databases. Standard skin cancer risk factors were obtained via questionnaire, and medications from hospital records. RESULTS: During a median follow-up time of 1.7 years, 29 (23%) and 30 (24%) lung transplant recipients with median duration of immunosuppression 3.3 years, developed SCC and BCC respectively. General population age-standardized incidence rates of SCC and BCC were 201 and 171 per 1000 person-years respectively (based on first primary SCC or BCC during follow-up), but on accounting for multiple primary tumours, corresponding incidence rates were 447 and 281 per 1000 person-years. Risk of multiple SCCs increased around 6-fold in those aged 60+ and in those with previous skin cancer and increased around 3-fold in those treated with the antifungal voriconazole. Multiple BCC risk rose 3-fold from age 60 years and 10-fold with previous skin cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Lung transplant recipients have very high incidence of multiple primary skin cancers. Close surveillance and assiduous prevention measures are essential.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttps://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjd.18812en
dc.titleSkin cancer multiplicity in lung transplant recipients: prospective, population-based studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentPopulation Health Department, QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Brisbane, Australiaen
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Dermatologyen
dc.description.noteen]


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