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dc.contributor.authorBellhouse, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorGalvin, L
dc.contributor.authorTurner, Lorraine
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Sally
dc.contributor.authorDavies, Michelle
dc.contributor.authorKrebs, Matthew G
dc.contributor.authorBerman, Richard
dc.contributor.authorYorke, Janelle
dc.date.accessioned2020-01-29T15:17:45Z
dc.date.available2020-01-29T15:17:45Z
dc.date.issued2019en
dc.identifier.citationBellhouse S, Galvin L, Turner L, Taylor S, Davies M, Krebs M, et al. Phase I cancer trials: a qualitative study of specialist palliative care. BMJ Support Palliat Care. 2019.en
dc.identifier.pmid31784463en
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-001919en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/622645
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: In recent years, a simultaneous care model for advanced cancer patients has been recommended meaning that palliative care services are offered throughout their cancer journey. To inform the successful adoption of this model in a phase I trial context, the study aimed to explore patients' care needs and their perceptions of specialist palliative care. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 advanced cancer patients referred to the Experimental Cancer Medicine team. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed with a framework approach to data organisation. RESULTS: Despite reporting considerable physical and psychological impacts from cancer and cancer treatment, participants did not recognise a need for specialist palliative care support. Understanding of the role of specialist palliative care was largely limited to end of life care. There was perceived conflict between considering a phase I trial and receiving specialist palliative care. Participants felt specialist palliative care should be introduced earlier and educational resources developed to increase patient acceptability of palliative care services. SIGNIFICANCE OF RESULTS: Patients with advanced cancer referred for phase I trials are likely to benefit from specialist palliative care. However, this study suggests patients may not recognise a need for support nor accept this support due to misperceptions about the role of palliative care. Developing a specific educational resource about specialist palliative care for this population would help overcome barriers to engaging with a simultaneous care model.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttps://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmjspcare-2019-001919en
dc.titlePhase I cancer trials: a qualitative study of specialist palliative careen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentChristie Patient Centred Research (CPCR), The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchesteren
dc.identifier.journalBMJ supportive & palliative careen
dc.description.noteen]


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