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dc.contributor.authorTinsley, Nadina
dc.contributor.authorYemula, N
dc.contributor.authorRamalingam, S
dc.contributor.authorMadathil, S
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-08T20:31:07Z
dc.date.available2018-08-08T20:31:07Z
dc.date.issued2018-06-21
dc.identifier.citationAn unusual case of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis in a patient with primary adenocarcinoma of the lung. 2018, 2018 BMJ Case Repen
dc.identifier.issn1757-790X
dc.identifier.pmid29930180
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bcr-2017-223649
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/621162
dc.description.abstractA 72-year-old man was brought to the emergency department with acute onset confusion and haemoptysis. Chest X-ray showed a possible lung mass, while CT head showed a fluid-filled, space-occupying lesion (SOL) in the right frontal lobe of the brain. MRI head indicated that this SOL had spilt its contents into the subarachnoid and intraventricular spaces. Due to a fluctuating Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), the patient underwent emergency debulking. Macroscopically, a frail-walled cystic tumour filled with straw-coloured fluid was noted; histology confirmed metastasis from a primary lung adenocarcinoma. Whole brain radiotherapy was given, with a view to commence systemic therapy. The patient, however, deteriorated and unfortunately passed away a few weeks after completing radiotherapy. This patient presented with leptomeningeal metastasis as the first presentation of a lung adenocarcinoma, and had a highly unusual mechanism by which leptomeningeal spread had occurred, with metastatic brain tumour spilling its contents into the meningeal spaces.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to BMJ case reportsen
dc.titleAn unusual case of leptomeningeal carcinomatosis in a patient with primary adenocarcinoma of the lung.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Oncology, Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UKen
dc.identifier.journalBMJ Case Reportsen
html.description.abstractA 72-year-old man was brought to the emergency department with acute onset confusion and haemoptysis. Chest X-ray showed a possible lung mass, while CT head showed a fluid-filled, space-occupying lesion (SOL) in the right frontal lobe of the brain. MRI head indicated that this SOL had spilt its contents into the subarachnoid and intraventricular spaces. Due to a fluctuating Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), the patient underwent emergency debulking. Macroscopically, a frail-walled cystic tumour filled with straw-coloured fluid was noted; histology confirmed metastasis from a primary lung adenocarcinoma. Whole brain radiotherapy was given, with a view to commence systemic therapy. The patient, however, deteriorated and unfortunately passed away a few weeks after completing radiotherapy. This patient presented with leptomeningeal metastasis as the first presentation of a lung adenocarcinoma, and had a highly unusual mechanism by which leptomeningeal spread had occurred, with metastatic brain tumour spilling its contents into the meningeal spaces.


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