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dc.contributor.authorIwen, K
dc.contributor.authorOelkrug, R
dc.contributor.authorKalscheuer, H
dc.contributor.authorBrabant, Georg E
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-29T12:36:53Z
dc.date.available2018-07-29T12:36:53Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.citationMetabolic Syndrome in Thyroid Disease. 2018, 49: 48-66 Front Horm Resen
dc.identifier.issn1662-3762
dc.identifier.pmid29895010
dc.identifier.doi10.1159/000485996
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/621152
dc.description.abstractCardiometabolic risk factors like abdominal obesity, hyperglycemia, low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, and hypertension are defined as metabolic syndrome (MetS), which represents one of the most frequent endocrine disorders particularly in a society with increasing weight problems. As more and more evidence is accumulated that thyroid hormones affect components of the MetS, the present review aims to summarize the rapidly expanding knowledge on the pathophysiological interaction between thyroid hormone status and MetS. The review is based on a PubMed search for combinations of thyroid hormone action and MetS, blood pressure, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, glucose, diabetes mellitus, body weight, or visceral fat. A special focus was given for manuscripts published after 2000 but we included seminal papers published before year 2000 as well.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Frontiers of hormone researchen
dc.titleMetabolic syndrome in thyroid disease.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMedizinische Klinik I, Experimentelle und Klinische Endokrinologie, Universität zu Lübeck, Lübeck, Germanyen
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers of Hormone Researchen
html.description.abstractCardiometabolic risk factors like abdominal obesity, hyperglycemia, low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, elevated triglycerides, and hypertension are defined as metabolic syndrome (MetS), which represents one of the most frequent endocrine disorders particularly in a society with increasing weight problems. As more and more evidence is accumulated that thyroid hormones affect components of the MetS, the present review aims to summarize the rapidly expanding knowledge on the pathophysiological interaction between thyroid hormone status and MetS. The review is based on a PubMed search for combinations of thyroid hormone action and MetS, blood pressure, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, glucose, diabetes mellitus, body weight, or visceral fat. A special focus was given for manuscripts published after 2000 but we included seminal papers published before year 2000 as well.


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