Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorFish, Rebecca
dc.contributor.authorSanders, C
dc.contributor.authorWilliamson, P
dc.contributor.authorRenehan, Andrew G
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-21T10:11:18Z
dc.date.available2017-12-21T10:11:18Z
dc.date.issued2017-11-22
dc.identifier.citationCore outcome research measures in anal cancer (CORMAC): protocol for systematic review, qualitative interviews and Delphi survey to develop a core outcome set in anal cancer. 2017, 7(11): e018726 BMJ Openen
dc.identifier.issn2044-6055
dc.identifier.pmid29170292
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjopen-2017-018726
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/620734
dc.description.abstractThe incidence of anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC) has increased threefold in the last 30 years. Initial treatment is chemoradiotherapy, associated with short-term and long-term side effects. Future therapy innovations aim to reduce morbidity in treatment of early tumours while maintaining treatment efficacy, and to escalate treatment intensity in locally advanced tumours with acceptable quality of life (QoL). However, all phase III randomised controlled trials to-date have utilised different primary outcomes, which hinders evidence synthesis and presents challenges to the selection of optimal outcomes in future trials. No trial comprehensively assessed long-term side effects and QoL, suggesting outcomes reflecting issues important to patients are under-represented. This project aims to determine the priority outcomes for all stakeholders and reach agreement on a standardised core set of outcomes to be measured and reported on in all future ASCC trials.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to BMJ openen
dc.titleCore outcome research measures in anal cancer (CORMAC): protocol for systematic review, qualitative interviews and Delphi survey to develop a core outcome set in anal cancer.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Cancer Sciences, School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Biology, Medicine and Health, University of Manchester, Manchester, UKen
dc.identifier.journalBMJ Openen
refterms.dateFOA2018-12-17T15:10:44Z
html.description.abstractThe incidence of anal squamous cell carcinoma (ASCC) has increased threefold in the last 30 years. Initial treatment is chemoradiotherapy, associated with short-term and long-term side effects. Future therapy innovations aim to reduce morbidity in treatment of early tumours while maintaining treatment efficacy, and to escalate treatment intensity in locally advanced tumours with acceptable quality of life (QoL). However, all phase III randomised controlled trials to-date have utilised different primary outcomes, which hinders evidence synthesis and presents challenges to the selection of optimal outcomes in future trials. No trial comprehensively assessed long-term side effects and QoL, suggesting outcomes reflecting issues important to patients are under-represented. This project aims to determine the priority outcomes for all stakeholders and reach agreement on a standardised core set of outcomes to be measured and reported on in all future ASCC trials.


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Name:
BMJOpene018726.full.pdf
Size:
322.0Kb
Format:
PDF
Description:
Full text, Open Access article

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record