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dc.contributor.authorAsh, C
dc.contributor.authorDubec, Michael
dc.contributor.authorDonne, K
dc.contributor.authorBashford, T
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-23T19:42:26Z
dc.date.available2017-10-23T19:42:26Z
dc.date.issued2017-09-12
dc.identifier.citationEffect of wavelength and beam width on penetration in light-tissue interaction using computational methods. 2017, Lasers Med Scien
dc.identifier.issn1435-604X
dc.identifier.pmid28900751
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s10103-017-2317-4
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/620620
dc.description.abstractPenetration depth of ultraviolet, visible light and infrared radiation in biological tissue has not previously been adequately measured. Risk assessment of typical intense pulsed light and laser intensities, spectral characteristics and the subsequent chemical, physiological and psychological effects of such outputs on vital organs as consequence of inappropriate output use are examined. This technical note focuses on wavelength, illumination geometry and skin tone and their effect on the energy density (fluence) distribution within tissue. Monte Carlo modelling is one of the most widely used stochastic methods for the modelling of light transport in turbid biological media such as human skin. Using custom Monte Carlo simulation software of a multi-layered skin model, fluence distributions are produced for various non-ionising radiation combinations. Fluence distributions were analysed using Matlab mathematical software. Penetration depth increases with increasing wavelength with a maximum penetration depth of 5378 μm calculated. The calculations show that a 10-mm beam width produces a fluence level at target depths of 1-3 mm equal to 73-88% (depending on depth) of the fluence level at the same depths produced by an infinitely wide beam of equal incident fluence. Meaning little additional penetration is achieved with larger spot sizes. Fluence distribution within tissue and thus the treatment efficacy depends upon the illumination geometry and wavelength. To optimise therapeutic techniques, light-tissue interactions must be thoroughly understood and can be greatly supported by the use of mathematical modelling techniques.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Lasers in medical scienceen
dc.titleEffect of wavelength and beam width on penetration in light-tissue interaction using computational methods.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Applied Computing, University of Wales Trinity Saint David, Swanseaen
dc.identifier.journalLasers in Medical Scienceen
refterms.dateFOA2018-12-17T15:05:19Z
html.description.abstractPenetration depth of ultraviolet, visible light and infrared radiation in biological tissue has not previously been adequately measured. Risk assessment of typical intense pulsed light and laser intensities, spectral characteristics and the subsequent chemical, physiological and psychological effects of such outputs on vital organs as consequence of inappropriate output use are examined. This technical note focuses on wavelength, illumination geometry and skin tone and their effect on the energy density (fluence) distribution within tissue. Monte Carlo modelling is one of the most widely used stochastic methods for the modelling of light transport in turbid biological media such as human skin. Using custom Monte Carlo simulation software of a multi-layered skin model, fluence distributions are produced for various non-ionising radiation combinations. Fluence distributions were analysed using Matlab mathematical software. Penetration depth increases with increasing wavelength with a maximum penetration depth of 5378 μm calculated. The calculations show that a 10-mm beam width produces a fluence level at target depths of 1-3 mm equal to 73-88% (depending on depth) of the fluence level at the same depths produced by an infinitely wide beam of equal incident fluence. Meaning little additional penetration is achieved with larger spot sizes. Fluence distribution within tissue and thus the treatment efficacy depends upon the illumination geometry and wavelength. To optimise therapeutic techniques, light-tissue interactions must be thoroughly understood and can be greatly supported by the use of mathematical modelling techniques.


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