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dc.contributor.authorDive, Caroline
dc.contributor.authorShishido, S
dc.contributor.authorKuhn, P
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-19T21:02:51Z
dc.date.available2017-03-19T21:02:51Z
dc.date.issued2017-02-09
dc.identifier.citation"Cancer moonshot connecting international liquid biopsy efforts through academic partnership". 2017, Clin Pharmacol Theren
dc.identifier.issn1532-6535
dc.identifier.pmid28182274
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/cpt.657
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/620206
dc.description.abstractThe Kuhn laboratory at the University of Southern California and the Dive laboratory at the Cancer Research UK's Manchester Institute are teaming up to apply new cancer cell detection technology to identify patients that will progress after initial treatment. Researchers will take a simple blood sample to identify early those patients whose cancer has returned, while analyzing CTCs in great detail, providing new clues on the most effective therapy for the patient's cancer. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Clinical pharmacology and therapeuticsen
dc.title"Cancer moonshot connecting international liquid biopsy efforts through academic partnership".en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalClinical Pharmacology and Therapeuticsen
html.description.abstractThe Kuhn laboratory at the University of Southern California and the Dive laboratory at the Cancer Research UK's Manchester Institute are teaming up to apply new cancer cell detection technology to identify patients that will progress after initial treatment. Researchers will take a simple blood sample to identify early those patients whose cancer has returned, while analyzing CTCs in great detail, providing new clues on the most effective therapy for the patient's cancer. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.


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