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dc.contributor.authorMartin, M
dc.contributor.authorVulin, A
dc.contributor.authorHendry, Jolyon H
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-02T16:55:38Z
dc.date.available2017-02-02T16:55:38Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationHuman epidermal stem cells: role in adverse skin reactions and carcinogenesis from radiation. 2016, 770 (Pt B):349-368 Mutat Resen
dc.identifier.issn1873-135X
dc.identifier.pmid27919341
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.mrrev.2016.08.004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/620124
dc.description.abstractIn human skin, keratinopoiesis is based on a functional hierarchy among keratinocytes, with rare slow-cycling stem cells responsible for the long-term maintenance of the tissue through their self-renewal potential, and more differentiated daughter progenitor cells actively cycling to permit epidermal renewal and turn-over every month. Skin is a radio-responsive tissue, developing all types of radiation damage and pathologies, including early tissue reactions such as dysplasia and denudation in epidermis, and later fibrosis in the dermis and acanthosis in epidermis, with the TGF-beta 1 pathway as a known master switch. Also there is a risk of basal cell carcinoma, which arises from epidermal keratinocytes, notably after oncogenic events in PTCH1 or TP53 genes. This review will cover the mechanisms of adverse human skin reactions and carcinogenesis after various types of exposures to ionizing radiation, with comparison with animal data when necessary, and will discuss the possible role of stem cells and their progeny in the development of these disorders. The main endpoints presented are basal cell intrinsic radiosensitivity, genomic stability, individual factors of risk, dose specific responses, major molecular pathways involved and the cellular origin of skin reactions and cancer. Although major advances have been obtained in recent years, the precise implications of epidermal stem cells and their progeny in these processes are not yet fully characterized.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Mutation researchen
dc.titleHuman epidermal stem cells: role in adverse skin reactions and carcinogenesis from radiation.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentCEA/DRF/IRCM/LGRK, 91057 Evry, Franceen
dc.identifier.journalMutation Researchen
refterms.dateFOA2018-12-17T14:47:26Z
html.description.abstractIn human skin, keratinopoiesis is based on a functional hierarchy among keratinocytes, with rare slow-cycling stem cells responsible for the long-term maintenance of the tissue through their self-renewal potential, and more differentiated daughter progenitor cells actively cycling to permit epidermal renewal and turn-over every month. Skin is a radio-responsive tissue, developing all types of radiation damage and pathologies, including early tissue reactions such as dysplasia and denudation in epidermis, and later fibrosis in the dermis and acanthosis in epidermis, with the TGF-beta 1 pathway as a known master switch. Also there is a risk of basal cell carcinoma, which arises from epidermal keratinocytes, notably after oncogenic events in PTCH1 or TP53 genes. This review will cover the mechanisms of adverse human skin reactions and carcinogenesis after various types of exposures to ionizing radiation, with comparison with animal data when necessary, and will discuss the possible role of stem cells and their progeny in the development of these disorders. The main endpoints presented are basal cell intrinsic radiosensitivity, genomic stability, individual factors of risk, dose specific responses, major molecular pathways involved and the cellular origin of skin reactions and cancer. Although major advances have been obtained in recent years, the precise implications of epidermal stem cells and their progeny in these processes are not yet fully characterized.


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