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dc.contributor.authorGkegkes, I
dc.contributor.authorIavazzo, Christos
dc.contributor.authorSardi, T
dc.contributor.authorFalagas, M
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-18T11:03:48Z
dc.date.available2017-01-18T11:03:48Z
dc.date.issued2016-11-15
dc.identifier.citationWomen physicians in Byzantium. 2016, World J Surgen
dc.identifier.issn1432-2323
dc.identifier.pmid27847967
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00268-016-3776-7
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/620089
dc.description.abstractWomen were allowed to practice the medical profession during the Byzantine Empire. The presence of female physicians was not an innovation of the Byzantine era but actually originated from ancient Greece and Rome. The studies and the training of women doctors were apparently equivalent to those of their male colleagues. The principal medical specialties of the female doctors were gynecology and midwifery. Byzantine legislation treated relatively equally both female and male doctors. For this reason, it can be assumed that the presence of female doctors was correlated with the position of women in Byzantine society. However, there is not sufficient information in the literature to clarify whether female and male doctors used to earn equal payment for the same service.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to World journal of surgeryen
dc.titleWomen physicians in Byzantium.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentFirst Department of Surgery, General Hospital of Attica 'KAT', Athens, Greeceen
dc.identifier.journalWorld Journal of Surgeryen
html.description.abstractWomen were allowed to practice the medical profession during the Byzantine Empire. The presence of female physicians was not an innovation of the Byzantine era but actually originated from ancient Greece and Rome. The studies and the training of women doctors were apparently equivalent to those of their male colleagues. The principal medical specialties of the female doctors were gynecology and midwifery. Byzantine legislation treated relatively equally both female and male doctors. For this reason, it can be assumed that the presence of female doctors was correlated with the position of women in Byzantine society. However, there is not sufficient information in the literature to clarify whether female and male doctors used to earn equal payment for the same service.


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