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dc.contributor.authorMiura, K
dc.contributor.authorHughes, M
dc.contributor.authorUngerer, J
dc.contributor.authorGreen, Adèle C
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-09T20:59:09Z
dc.date.available2016-12-09T20:59:09Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-13
dc.identifier.citationPlasma eicosapentaenoic acid is negatively associated with all-cause mortality among men and women in a population-based prospective study. 2016, Nutr Resen
dc.identifier.issn1879-0739
dc.identifier.pmid27865614
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.nutres.2016.09.006
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/620040
dc.description.abstractOmega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have anti-inflammatory properties, whereas omega-6 PUFAs appear to have proinflammatory properties. We aimed to assess plasma omega-3 and omega-6 PUFA status in relation to all-cause mortality in an Australian community-based study. We hypothesized that omega-3 PUFA would be inversely associated, and omega-6 PUFA positively associated with all-cause mortality. Plasma phospholipid omega-3 (eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA], docosapentaenoic acid [DPA], docosahexaenoic acid, α-linolenic acid, and total) and omega-6 PUFAs (linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, and total) were measured among 1008 adults (44% men) in 1996. Plasma PUFA composition was quantified using gas chromatography. During 17-year follow-up, 98 men and 81 women died. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, plasma EPA was inversely associated with all-cause mortality overall (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] per 1-SD increase, 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.68-0.95), in men (HR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.62-0.98), and in women (HR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.65-0.94), separately. Inverse associations with mortality among men were also seen for DPA (HR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.60-0.97) and α-linolenic acid (HR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.57-0.94). No omega-6 PUFAs were significantly associated with mortality. Our findings of reduced all-cause mortality in men and women who have high EPA in plasma, and in men with high plasma DPA and α-linolenic acid, partially support our hypothesis that omega-3 PUFAs help reduce mortality but provide no evidence that omega-6 PUFAs may increase mortality.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Nutrition research (New York, N.Y.)en
dc.titlePlasma eicosapentaenoic acid is negatively associated with all-cause mortality among men and women in a population-based prospective study.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentQIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute, Cancer and Population Studies Group, 300 Herston Rd, Herston, Brisbane, Queensland 4006, Australiaen
dc.identifier.journalNutrition Researchen
html.description.abstractOmega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have anti-inflammatory properties, whereas omega-6 PUFAs appear to have proinflammatory properties. We aimed to assess plasma omega-3 and omega-6 PUFA status in relation to all-cause mortality in an Australian community-based study. We hypothesized that omega-3 PUFA would be inversely associated, and omega-6 PUFA positively associated with all-cause mortality. Plasma phospholipid omega-3 (eicosapentaenoic acid [EPA], docosapentaenoic acid [DPA], docosahexaenoic acid, α-linolenic acid, and total) and omega-6 PUFAs (linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, and total) were measured among 1008 adults (44% men) in 1996. Plasma PUFA composition was quantified using gas chromatography. During 17-year follow-up, 98 men and 81 women died. After adjustment for potential confounding factors, plasma EPA was inversely associated with all-cause mortality overall (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] per 1-SD increase, 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.68-0.95), in men (HR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.62-0.98), and in women (HR, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.65-0.94), separately. Inverse associations with mortality among men were also seen for DPA (HR, 0.76; 95% CI, 0.60-0.97) and α-linolenic acid (HR, 0.73; 95% CI, 0.57-0.94). No omega-6 PUFAs were significantly associated with mortality. Our findings of reduced all-cause mortality in men and women who have high EPA in plasma, and in men with high plasma DPA and α-linolenic acid, partially support our hypothesis that omega-3 PUFAs help reduce mortality but provide no evidence that omega-6 PUFAs may increase mortality.


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