Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorCalifano, Raffaele
dc.contributor.authorKerr, K
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, Robert David
dc.contributor.authorRusso, G
dc.contributor.authorGarassino, M
dc.contributor.authorMorgillo, F
dc.contributor.authorRossi, A
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-12T14:18:46Z
dc.date.available2016-10-12T14:18:46Z
dc.date.issued2016-09
dc.identifier.citationImmune Checkpoint Blockade: A New Era for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer. 2016, 18 (9):59 Curr Oncol Repen
dc.identifier.issn1534-6269
dc.identifier.pmid27484062
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11912-016-0544-7
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/619946
dc.description.abstractDespite better understanding of it's molecular biology, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains a challenging disease to treat. Unfortunately, treatment options are still very limited and prognosis for advanced disease is poor. Immune surveillance plays a crucial role in a host's defence against tumour cells, and this is particular relevant for lung cancer due to it's high somatic mutational load, which increases the chances for the immune system to recognize cancer cells as 'non-self'. Novel immunotherapies are emerging as an effective treatment for this disease. In this review, we present the data on immune checkpoint inhibitors for NSCLC, describing their mechanism of action, data efficacy from recent clinical trials, and strategies to select patients more likely to benefit from these agents.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Current oncology reportsen
dc.titleImmune Checkpoint Blockade: A New Era for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Medical Oncology, The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchesteren
dc.identifier.journalCurrent Oncology Reportsen
html.description.abstractDespite better understanding of it's molecular biology, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains a challenging disease to treat. Unfortunately, treatment options are still very limited and prognosis for advanced disease is poor. Immune surveillance plays a crucial role in a host's defence against tumour cells, and this is particular relevant for lung cancer due to it's high somatic mutational load, which increases the chances for the immune system to recognize cancer cells as 'non-self'. Novel immunotherapies are emerging as an effective treatment for this disease. In this review, we present the data on immune checkpoint inhibitors for NSCLC, describing their mechanism of action, data efficacy from recent clinical trials, and strategies to select patients more likely to benefit from these agents.


This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record