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dc.contributor.authorMitchell, Darren M
dc.contributor.authorSwindell, Ric
dc.contributor.authorElliott, Tony
dc.contributor.authorWylie, James P
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Cathy M
dc.contributor.authorLogue, John P
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T23:24:41Z
dc.date.available2009-04-01T23:24:41Z
dc.date.issued2008-07
dc.identifier.citationAnalysis of prostate-specific antigen bounce after I(125) permanent seed implant for localised prostate cancer. 2008, 88 (1):102-7 Radiother Oncolen
dc.identifier.issn0167-8140
dc.identifier.pmid18453022
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.radonc.2008.04.004
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/58723
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To report on the incidence of benign prostate-specific antigen bounce following permanent I(125) prostate brachytherapy, to describe the associations in our population and review the relationship of bounce to subsequent biochemical failure. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From February 2000 to May 2005, 374 patients with localised prostate cancer were treated with I(125) permanent prostate brachytherapy at a single institution. A prospectively collected database was used to identify cases of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce, defined as a rise of 0.2 ng/ml above an initial PSA nadir with subsequent decline to or below that nadir without treatment. The patients who received neo-adjuvant or adjuvant hormone manipulation were excluded. Biochemical failure was determined using the both the ASTRO consensus definition and Phoenix (nadir +2 ng/mL) definition. RESULTS: Two hundred and five patients were identified with a median follow-up of 45 months (24-85). PSA bounce was noted in 79 (37%) men, occurring at a median of 14.8 months (1.7-40.6) following implant. The median peak PSA was 1.8 ng/ml (0.4-7.4) with a bounce magnitude of 0.91 ng/ml (0.2-5.8). When pre- and post-implant factors were assessed for association to bounce, only younger age was statistically significant (p=0.002). The threshold for biochemical failure as defined by the ASTRO consensus definition (1997) was met in 4 (5%) patients after experiencing bounce as opposed to 19 (15%) non-bounce patients (p=0.01). The threshold for Phoenix (nadir +2 ng/mL) was met in 6 (7.5%) patients following bounce versus 22 (17%) of non-bounce patients (p=0.003). Both definitions are prone to false positive calls during bounce. Median PSA velocity during the bounce was 0.08 ng/mL/month (0.02-0.98) and was statistically significantly lower than the median velocity prior to the Phoenix biochemical failure at 0.28 ng/mL/month (0.07-2.04) (p=0.0005). CONCLUSION: PSA bounce is a common finding in our population and is associated with a lower rate of subsequent biochemical failure. The noted differences in PSA velocity will require verification in a future analysis to reduce the influence of median follow-up on this finding. Patients should be advised of the potential of bounce in PSA follow-up after permanent I(125) prostate brachytherapy and physicians involved in follow-up of prostate brachytherapy patients should be aware of this phenomenon, allowing them to commit to appropriate PSA surveillance, avoiding the premature and inappropriate initiation of salvage therapy during PSA bounce.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectProstatic Canceren
dc.subjectPSAen
dc.subjectKineticsen
dc.subject.meshAdult
dc.subject.meshAged
dc.subject.meshBrachytherapy
dc.subject.meshHumans
dc.subject.meshIodine Radioisotopes
dc.subject.meshMale
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged
dc.subject.meshProspective Studies
dc.subject.meshProstate-Specific Antigen
dc.subject.meshProstatic Neoplasms
dc.subject.meshStatistics, Nonparametric
dc.subject.meshSurvival Analysis
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome
dc.subject.meshUltrasonography, Interventional
dc.titleAnalysis of prostate-specific antigen bounce after I(125) permanent seed implant for localised prostate cancer.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Clinical Oncology, Christie NHS Trust, Manchester, UK. dmmitchell@doctors.org.uken
dc.identifier.journalRadiotherapy and Oncologyen
html.description.abstractBACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: To report on the incidence of benign prostate-specific antigen bounce following permanent I(125) prostate brachytherapy, to describe the associations in our population and review the relationship of bounce to subsequent biochemical failure. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From February 2000 to May 2005, 374 patients with localised prostate cancer were treated with I(125) permanent prostate brachytherapy at a single institution. A prospectively collected database was used to identify cases of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) bounce, defined as a rise of 0.2 ng/ml above an initial PSA nadir with subsequent decline to or below that nadir without treatment. The patients who received neo-adjuvant or adjuvant hormone manipulation were excluded. Biochemical failure was determined using the both the ASTRO consensus definition and Phoenix (nadir +2 ng/mL) definition. RESULTS: Two hundred and five patients were identified with a median follow-up of 45 months (24-85). PSA bounce was noted in 79 (37%) men, occurring at a median of 14.8 months (1.7-40.6) following implant. The median peak PSA was 1.8 ng/ml (0.4-7.4) with a bounce magnitude of 0.91 ng/ml (0.2-5.8). When pre- and post-implant factors were assessed for association to bounce, only younger age was statistically significant (p=0.002). The threshold for biochemical failure as defined by the ASTRO consensus definition (1997) was met in 4 (5%) patients after experiencing bounce as opposed to 19 (15%) non-bounce patients (p=0.01). The threshold for Phoenix (nadir +2 ng/mL) was met in 6 (7.5%) patients following bounce versus 22 (17%) of non-bounce patients (p=0.003). Both definitions are prone to false positive calls during bounce. Median PSA velocity during the bounce was 0.08 ng/mL/month (0.02-0.98) and was statistically significantly lower than the median velocity prior to the Phoenix biochemical failure at 0.28 ng/mL/month (0.07-2.04) (p=0.0005). CONCLUSION: PSA bounce is a common finding in our population and is associated with a lower rate of subsequent biochemical failure. The noted differences in PSA velocity will require verification in a future analysis to reduce the influence of median follow-up on this finding. Patients should be advised of the potential of bounce in PSA follow-up after permanent I(125) prostate brachytherapy and physicians involved in follow-up of prostate brachytherapy patients should be aware of this phenomenon, allowing them to commit to appropriate PSA surveillance, avoiding the premature and inappropriate initiation of salvage therapy during PSA bounce.


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