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dc.contributor.authorWang, N
dc.contributor.authorReeves, Kimberley J
dc.contributor.authorBrown, H
dc.contributor.authorFowles, A
dc.contributor.authorDocherty, F
dc.contributor.authorOttewell, P
dc.contributor.authorCroucher, P
dc.contributor.authorHolen, I
dc.contributor.authorEaton, C
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-03T22:44:51Zen
dc.date.available2015-12-03T22:44:51Zen
dc.date.issued2015en
dc.identifier.citationThe frequency of osteolytic bone metastasis is determined by conditions of the soil, not the number of seeds; evidence from in vivo models of breast and prostate cancer. 2015, 34 (1):124 J Exp Clin Cancer Resen
dc.identifier.issn1756-9966en
dc.identifier.pmid26480944en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s13046-015-0240-8en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10541/583216en
dc.description.abstractWhile both preclinical and clinical studies suggest that the frequency of growing skeletal metastases is elevated in individuals with higher bone turnover, it is unclear whether this is a result of increased numbers of tumour cells arriving in active sites or of higher numbers of tumour cells being induced to divide by the bone micro-environment. Here we have investigated how the differences in bone turnover affect seeding of tumour cells and/or development of overt osteolytic bone metastasis using in vivo models of hormone-independent breast and prostate cancer.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Journal of experimental & clinical cancer research : CRen
dc.titleThe frequency of osteolytic bone metastasis is determined by conditions of the soil, not the number of seeds; evidence from in vivo models of breast and prostate cancer.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentThe Mellanby Centre for Bone Research, Department of Human Metabolism, Medical School, University of Sheffield, Beech Hill Road, Sheffield, S10 2RXen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Experimental & Clinical Cancer Researchen
html.description.abstractWhile both preclinical and clinical studies suggest that the frequency of growing skeletal metastases is elevated in individuals with higher bone turnover, it is unclear whether this is a result of increased numbers of tumour cells arriving in active sites or of higher numbers of tumour cells being induced to divide by the bone micro-environment. Here we have investigated how the differences in bone turnover affect seeding of tumour cells and/or development of overt osteolytic bone metastasis using in vivo models of hormone-independent breast and prostate cancer.


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