• Assessment of bladder motion for clinical radiotherapy practice using cine-magnetic resonance imaging.

      McBain, Catherine A; Khoo, Vincent S; Buckley, David L; Sykes, Jonathan S; Green, Melanie M; Cowan, Richard A; Hutchinson, Charles E; Moore, Christopher J; Price, Patricia M; Academic Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Manchester, Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester, United Kingdom. (2009-11-01)
      PURPOSE: Organ motion is recognized as the principal source of inaccuracy in bladder radiotherapy (RT), but there is currently little information on intrafraction bladder motion. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We used cine-magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI) to study bladder motion relevant to intrafraction RT delivery. On two occasions, a 28 minute cine-MRI sequence was acquired from 10 bladder cancer patients and 5 control participants immediately after bladder emptying, after abstinence from drinking for the preceding hour. From the resulting cine sequences, bladder motion was subjectively assessed. To quantify bladder motion, the bladder was contoured in imaging volume sets at 0, 14, and 28 min to measure changes to bladder volumes, wall displacements, and center of gravity (COG) over time. RESULTS: The dominant source of bladder motion during imaging was bladder filling (up to 101% volume increase); rectal and small bowel movements were transient, with minimal impact. Bladder volume changes were similar for all participants. However for bladder cancer patients, wall displacements were larger (up to 58 mm), less symmetrical, and more variable compared with nondiseased control bladders. CONCLUSIONS: Significant and individualized intrafraction bladder wall displacements may occur during bladder RT delivery. This important source of inaccuracy should be incorporated into treatment planning and verification.
    • Rectal motion can reduce CTV coverage and increase rectal dose during prostate radiotherapy: A daily cone-beam CT study.

      Sripadam, Raj; Stratford, Julia; Henry, Ann M; Jackson, Andrew; Moore, Christopher J; Price, Patricia M; Clatterbridge Centre for Oncology, Bebington, Wirral, UK. (2009-03)
      BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Daily on-treatment verification cone-beam CT (CBCT) was used to study the effect of rectal motion on clinical target volume (CTV) coverage during prostate radiotherapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: CBCT scans were acquired from 15 patients immediately after daily treatment. From these images, the rectum was contoured allowing the analysis of rectal volume cross-sectional area (CSA) and the determination of rectal dose. Rectal wall motion was quantified as a surrogate measure of prostate displacement and CTV coverage was subjectively assessed. RESULTS: Rectal volume decreased over the treatment course in 13 patients (P<0.001). Rectal wall regions corresponding to the prostate base displayed the greatest motion; larger displacements were seen in patients with larger rectal planning volumes. CTV coverage was inadequate, at the prostate base only, in 38% of the fractions delivered to 4/7 patients with a large rectum at planning (>100 cm(3)). In patients with small rectum at planning (<50 cm(3)) up to 25% more rectal volume than predicted was included in the high-dose region. CONCLUSIONS: Rectal motion during treatment in prostate cancer patients has implications for CTV coverage and rectal dose. Measures to ensure consistency in daily rectal volume or image-guided strategies should be considered.