• Biodistribution, pharmacokinetics and metabolism of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) using [¹⁸F]-IL1RA and PET imaging in rats.

      Cawthorne, Christopher; Prenant, C; Smigova, A; Julyan, Peter J; Maroy, R; Herholz, K; Rothwell, N; Boutin, H; Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. (2011-02)
      Positron emission tomography (PET) has the potential to improve our understanding of the preclinical pharmacokinetics and metabolism of therapeutic agents, and is easily translated to clinical studies in humans. However, studies involving proteins radiolabelled with clinically relevant PET isotopes are currently limited. Here we illustrate the potential of PET imaging in a preclinical study of the biodistribution and metabolism of ¹⁸F-labelled IL-1 receptor antagonist ([¹⁸F]IL-1RA) using a novel [¹⁸F]-radiolabelling technique.
    • An efficient synthetic strategy for obtaining 4-methoxy carbon isotope labeled combretastatin A-4 phosphate and other Z-combretastatins.

      Pettit, George R; Minardi, Mathew D; Hogan, Fiona; Price, Patricia M; Cancer Research Institute and Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-1604, USA. bpettit@asu.edu (2010-03-26)
      Human cancer and other clinical trials under development employing combretastatin A-4 phosphate (1b, CA4P) should benefit from the availability of a [(11)C]-labeled derivative for positron emission tomography (PET). In order to obtain a suitable precursor for addition of a [(11)C]methyl group at the penultimate step, several new synthetic pathways to CA4P were evaluated. Geometrical isomerization (Z to E) proved to be a challenge, but it was overcome by development of a new CA4P synthesis suitable for 4-methoxy isotope labeling.
    • A new model for prediction of drug distribution in tumor and normal tissues: pharmacokinetics of temozolomide in glioma patients.

      Rosso, Lula; Brock, Cathryn S; Gallo, James M; Saleem, Azeem; Price, Patricia M; Turkheimer, Federico E; Aboagye, E O; Clinical Sciences Centre, Imperial College, Faculty of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital Campus, London, UK. (2009-01-01)
      Difficulties in direct measurement of drug concentrations in human tissues have hampered the understanding of drug accumulation in tumors and normal tissues. We propose a new system analysis modeling approach to characterize drug distribution in tissues based on human positron emission tomography (PET) data. The PET system analysis method was applied to temozolomide, an important alkylating agent used in the treatment of brain tumors, as part of standard temozolomide treatment regimens in patients. The system analysis technique, embodied in the convolution integral, generated an impulse response function that, when convolved with temozolomide plasma concentration input functions, yielded predicted normal brain and brain tumor temozolomide concentration profiles for different temozolomide dosing regimens (75-200 mg/m(2)/d). Predicted peak concentrations of temozolomide ranged from 2.9 to 6.7 microg/mL in human glioma tumors and from 1.8 to 3.7 microg/mL in normal brain, with the total drug exposure, as indicated by the tissue/plasma area under the curve ratio, being about 1.3 in tumor compared with 0.9 in normal brain. The higher temozolomide exposures in brain tumor relative to normal brain were attributed to breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and possibly secondary to increased intratumoral angiogenesis. Overall, the method is considered a robust tool to analyze and predict tissue drug concentrations to help select the most rational dosing schedules.
    • No relationship between 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and expression of Glut-1 and -3 and hexokinase I and II in high-grade glioma.

      Charnley, Natalie; Airley, R; Du Plessis, D; West, Catharine M L; Brock, Cathryn S; Barnett, C; Matthews, Julian C; Symonds, Kirsten; Bottomly, M; Swindell, Ric; et al. (2008-09)
      The purpose of this study was to compare glucose metabolism, measured using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([18F]FDG-PET), with the expression of Glut-1 and -3 and hexokinase I (Hex I) and II in high-grade glioma. The retrospective study involved 27 patients with WHO classification grade III and IV glioma, with either newly diagnosed or recurrent tumours. Patients underwent dynamic and static [18F]FDG-PET to glucose metabolic rate (MRGlu) and standardised uptake value (SUV), respectively. Tumour biopsies were obtained and stained using immunohistochemistry for the expression of Glut-1, -3, Hex I and II. Relationships between variables were studied using Spearman's rank correlation test. Results showed that the expression of Glut-1, Glut-3, Hex I and Hex II varied between and within the tumour samples. The mean of MRGlu was 0.2 (range 0.09-0.25) micromol/min/ml and that of SUV was 4.2 (range 3.2-5.2). There were no significant relationships among the tumour expression of any of the proteins studied with either MRGlu or SUV (p>0.21 for all). In conclusion, the lack of relationship between the immunohistochemical expression of Glut-1, -3, Hex I or II and glucose metabolism measured using [18F]FDG-PET in patients with high-grade glioma may be due to the tissue heterogeneity and presence of necrosis in high-grade tumours.
    • Optimization of the injected activity in dynamic 3D PET: a generalized approach using patient-specific NECs as demonstrated by a series of 15O-H2O scans.

      Walker, Mathew D; Matthews, Julian C; Asselin, Marie-Claude; Saleem, Azeem; Dickinson, Clare; Charnley, Natalie; Julyan, Peter J; Price, Patricia M; Jones, Terry; School of Cancer and Imaging Sciences, Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom. (2009-01-30)
    • Positron emission tomography imaging approaches for external beam radiation therapies: current status and future developments.

      Price, Patricia M; Green, Melanie M; Department of Academic Radiation Oncology, The University of Manchester, The Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester, UK. pprice@imperial.ac.uk (2011-12)
      In an era in which it is possible to deliver radiation with high precision, there is a heightened need for enhanced imaging capabilities to improve tumour localisation for diagnostic, planning and delivery purposes. This is necessary to increase the accuracy and overall efficacy of all types of external beam radiotherapy (RT), including particle therapies. Positron emission tomography (PET) has the potential to fulfil this need by imaging fundamental aspects of tumour biology. The key areas in which PET may support the RT process include improving disease diagnosis and staging; assisting tumour volume delineation; defining tumour phenotype or biological tumour volume; assessment of treatment response; and in-beam monitoring of radiation dosimetry. The role of PET and its current developmental status in these key areas are overviewed in this review, highlighting the advantages and drawbacks.
    • Radical chemoradiotherapy for adenocarcinoma of the distal oesophagus and oesophagogastric junction: what planning margins should we use?

      Whitfield, Gillian A; Jackson, Andrew; Moore, Christopher J; Price, Patricia M; Academic Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. gillian.whitfield@manchester.ac.uk (2008-12)
      Distal oesophageal and Type I-II oesophagogastric junctional adenocarcinomas have a poor prognosis. In radical chemoradiotherapy, consensus is lacking on radiotherapy margins. Here, we review the effect of common imaging modalities on the extent of the gross tumour volume (GTV) and the evidence for margins. To do this, papers were identified from PubMed, and geometric uncertainties were combined using the British Institute of Radiology formula. CT and endoscopic ultrasound were best for GTV delineation, but the role of positron emission tomography is uncertain. Evidence suggests 3 cm proximal and 5 cm distal GTV-CTV (clinical target volume) margins (along the mucosa) for advanced tumours, but is lacking for early tumours and radial margins. Nodal spread, present in most pT2 tumours, is strongly prognostic and is initially to regional nodes (not wholly covered by typical radiotherapy). Calculated CTV-PTV (planning target volume) margins for three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy using literature estimates of tumour motion and set-up errors with bony online set-up correction, ignoring delineation errors, are 2.2 cm superiorly (sup) and inferiorly (inf) and 1.2-1.3 cm radially (1.3 cm sup-inf; 0.8 cm radially if the tumour's mid-position is known). As these margins may risk excessive toxicity, we propose treating microscopic disease for potentially curable tumours (cT2N0, some cT3N0), but gross disease only for advanced tumours. Recommended GTV-CTV margins are a maximum of 3 cm proximally and 5 cm distally up to cT2N0; 3 cm proximally and 5 cm distally for cT3N0 if anticipated toxicity allows; and 0 cm for cT4 and most node-positive tumours. The CTV-PTV margins above must be added to this for all stages. Methods of including elective nodal areas close to the GTV should be researched, e.g. nodal maps and intensity-modulated radiotherapy.
    • The role of PET in target localization for radiotherapy treatment planning.

      Rembielak, Agata; Price, Patricia M; Academic Department of Radiation Oncology, Division of Cancer Studies, The University of Manchester, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester, United Kingdom. agata.rembielak@manchester.ac.uk (2008-02)
      Positron emission tomography (PET) is currently accepted as an important tool in oncology, mostly for diagnosis, staging and restaging purposes. It provides a new type of information in radiotherapy, functional rather than anatomical. PET imaging can also be used for target volume definition in radiotherapy treatment planning. The need for very precise target volume delineation has arisen with the increasing use of sophisticated three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy techniques and intensity modulated radiation therapy. It is expected that better delineation of the target volume may lead to a significant reduction in the irradiated volume, thus lowering the risk of treatment complications (smaller safety margins). Better tumour visualisation also allows a higher dose of radiation to be applied to the tumour, which may lead to better tumour control. The aim of this article is to review the possible use of PET imaging in the radiotherapy of various cancers. We focus mainly on non-small cell lung cancer, lymphoma and oesophageal cancer, but also include current opinion on the use of PET-based planning in other tumours including brain, uterine cervix, rectum and prostate.