• Hypoxia-associated markers in gastric carcinogenesis and HIF-2alpha in gastric and gastro-oesophageal cancer prognosis.

      Griffiths, Ewen A; Pritchard, S A; McGrath, S M; Valentine, Helen R; Price, Patricia M; Welch, I M; West, Catharine M L; Academic Department of Radiation Oncology, School of Cancer & Imaging Sciences, The University of Manchester, Christie Hospital, Wilmslow Road, Withington, Manchester M20 4BX, UK. (2008-03-11)
      The study investigated hypoxia-associated markers (HIF-2alpha, Epo, Epo-R, Glut-1 and VEGF) along with Ki-67 in a gastric carcinogenesis model, and the prognostic significance of hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-2alpha in surgically treated gastro-oesophageal cancer. Protein expression was examined using immunohistochemistry on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded biopsies of normal mucosa (n=20), Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis (n=24), intestinal metaplasia (n=24), dysplasia (n=12) and intestinal (n=19) and diffuse (n=21) adenocarcinoma. Relationships between HIF-2alpha expression and prognosis were assessed in resection specimens from 177 patients with gastric and gastro-oesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. Expression of all markers increased with progression along the gastric carcinogenesis sequence (P=0.0001). Hypoxia-inducible factor-2alpha was expressed in 63% of 177 resection specimens and at a high level in 44%. The median overall survival in patients with HIF-2alpha-expressing tumours was 22 (95% CI 18-26) months, whereas those with HIF-2alpha-negative tumours had a median survival of 37 (95% CI 29-44) months (P=0.015). Hypoxia-inducible factor-2alpha had no independent prognostic significance in multivariate analysis. In view of the lack of independent prognostic significance, HIF-2alpha has no role as a routine prognostic indicator. However, the high expression of HIF-2alpha suggests that it may be of value as a potential therapeutic target.
    • No relationship between 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography and expression of Glut-1 and -3 and hexokinase I and II in high-grade glioma.

      Charnley, Natalie; Airley, R; Du Plessis, D; West, Catharine M L; Brock, Cathryn S; Barnett, C; Matthews, Julian C; Symonds, Kirsten; Bottomly, M; Swindell, Ric; et al. (2008-09)
      The purpose of this study was to compare glucose metabolism, measured using 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([18F]FDG-PET), with the expression of Glut-1 and -3 and hexokinase I (Hex I) and II in high-grade glioma. The retrospective study involved 27 patients with WHO classification grade III and IV glioma, with either newly diagnosed or recurrent tumours. Patients underwent dynamic and static [18F]FDG-PET to glucose metabolic rate (MRGlu) and standardised uptake value (SUV), respectively. Tumour biopsies were obtained and stained using immunohistochemistry for the expression of Glut-1, -3, Hex I and II. Relationships between variables were studied using Spearman's rank correlation test. Results showed that the expression of Glut-1, Glut-3, Hex I and Hex II varied between and within the tumour samples. The mean of MRGlu was 0.2 (range 0.09-0.25) micromol/min/ml and that of SUV was 4.2 (range 3.2-5.2). There were no significant relationships among the tumour expression of any of the proteins studied with either MRGlu or SUV (p>0.21 for all). In conclusion, the lack of relationship between the immunohistochemical expression of Glut-1, -3, Hex I or II and glucose metabolism measured using [18F]FDG-PET in patients with high-grade glioma may be due to the tissue heterogeneity and presence of necrosis in high-grade tumours.
    • Use of multiple biological markers in radiotherapy-treated head and neck cancer.

      Silva, Priyamal; Slevin, Nicholas J; Sloan, Philip; Valentine, Helen R; Ryder, W David J; Price, Patricia M; West, Catharine M L; Homer, Jarrod J; School of Cancer & Enabling Sciences, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. (2010-06)
      OBJECTIVE: Management of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma is often based on clinical parameters, with little appreciation of the underlying tumour biology. Single biological marker studies fail to acknowledge the complexity of these tumours. Our aim was to define a profile of biological markers associated with outcome. DESIGN: This retrospective study involved consecutive patients with oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated with primary radiotherapy between 1996 and 2001. Pre-treatment biopsies were used to study the immunohistochemical expression of nine biological markers. Markers were chosen to reflect biologically relevant pathways. RESULTS: Following analysis of nine markers, a profile of two markers was derived (carbonic anhydrase 9 and major vault protein), the co-expression of which conferred a significantly poor probability of locoregional control. The prognostic effect of these biomarkers in combination was greater than their effect individually. CONCLUSION: Biomarker profiles can be established which highlight large differences in locoregional control. Identifying tumours that express both carbonic anhydrase 9 and major vault protein may facilitate patient selection for more aggressive treatment.