• Assessment of bladder motion for clinical radiotherapy practice using cine-magnetic resonance imaging.

      McBain, Catherine A; Khoo, Vincent S; Buckley, David L; Sykes, Jonathan S; Green, Melanie M; Cowan, Richard A; Hutchinson, Charles E; Moore, Christopher J; Price, Patricia M; Academic Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Manchester, Christie Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Wilmslow Road, Manchester, United Kingdom. (2009-11-01)
      PURPOSE: Organ motion is recognized as the principal source of inaccuracy in bladder radiotherapy (RT), but there is currently little information on intrafraction bladder motion. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We used cine-magnetic resonance imaging (cine-MRI) to study bladder motion relevant to intrafraction RT delivery. On two occasions, a 28 minute cine-MRI sequence was acquired from 10 bladder cancer patients and 5 control participants immediately after bladder emptying, after abstinence from drinking for the preceding hour. From the resulting cine sequences, bladder motion was subjectively assessed. To quantify bladder motion, the bladder was contoured in imaging volume sets at 0, 14, and 28 min to measure changes to bladder volumes, wall displacements, and center of gravity (COG) over time. RESULTS: The dominant source of bladder motion during imaging was bladder filling (up to 101% volume increase); rectal and small bowel movements were transient, with minimal impact. Bladder volume changes were similar for all participants. However for bladder cancer patients, wall displacements were larger (up to 58 mm), less symmetrical, and more variable compared with nondiseased control bladders. CONCLUSIONS: Significant and individualized intrafraction bladder wall displacements may occur during bladder RT delivery. This important source of inaccuracy should be incorporated into treatment planning and verification.
    • Strong association of the HLA-DP6 supertype with childhood leukaemia is due to a single allele, DPB1*0601.

      Taylor, G M; Hussain, A; Verhage, V; Thompson, P D; Fergusson, W D; Watkins, Gillian R; Lightfoot, T; Harrison, Christine J; Birch, Jillian M; Cancer Immunogenetics Group, School of Cancer and Imaging Sciences, University of Manchester, St Mary's Hospital, Manchester, UK. gmtaylor@manchester.ac.uk (2009-05)
      We previously reported that susceptibility to childhood B cell precursor ALL (BCP ALL) is associated with HLA-DPB1 alleles having glutamic acid (E) rather than lysine (K) in the P4 antigenic peptide-binding pocket. Clustering approximately 90% of DPB1 alleles into DPB69E (DP2, 6, 8) and DPB69K (DP1, 3, 4) supertypes revealed that DP2 and DP8 are associated with BCP ALL, but DP6 is also associated with non-BCP leukaemia. Here, we report that only one of seven alleles with the DP6 supertype (DPB1(*)0601) is associated with childhood leukaemia (leukaemia vs controls: odds ratio, 95% confidence interval [OR, CI]: 4.6, 2.0-10.4; corrected P=0.019), but not with childhood solid tumours or lymphomas. DPB1(*)0601 is also significantly associated with leukaemia subtypes, including BCP ALL, Pro-B ALL, T-ALL and AML. DPB1(*)0601 is significantly over-transmitted (76.9%) from parents to children with BCP ALL (OR; CI: 4.7; 1.01-22.2). Sequencing the coding region of DPB1(*)0601 revealed an exon 1-4 haplotype [T-DEAV-KIL-RVI] shared with DPB1(*)0301 and 0901, but no evidence of germline mutations in childhood leukaemia. These results suggest that the DPbeta0601 molecule may be functionally involved in childhood leukaemia. Analysis of peptide binding and T-cell activation by DPbeta0601-peptide complexes should help determine its role in childhood leukaemia causation.