• 21st L H Gray Conference: the radiobiology/radiation protection interface.

      West, Catharine M L; Martin, C J; Sutton, D G; Wright, Eric G; Academic Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Manchester, Christie Hospital, UK. catharine.west@manchester.ac.uk (2009-05)
      The 21st L H Gray Conference, organised by the L H Gray Trust with the Society for Radiological Protection, brought together international experts in radiobiology, epidemiology and risk assessment, and scientists involved in diagnostic and therapeutic radiation exposure. The meeting - held in Edinburgh, Scotland, on 4-6 June 2008 - aimed to raise awareness, educate and share knowledge of important issues in radiation protection. A distinguished group of speakers discussed topics that included (i) non-targeted effects of radiation, (ii) exposure to high natural background radiation, (iii) non-cancer effects in Japanese bomb survivors, (iv) lessons learnt from Chernobyl, (v) radiation in the workplace, (vi) biokinetic modelling, (vii) uncertainties in risk estimation, (viii) issues in diagnostic medical exposures, (ix) lessons leant from the polonium-210 incidence and (x) how the radiobiology/radiation oncology community is needed to help society prepare for potential future acts of radiation terrorism. The conference highlighted the importance, relevance and topicality of radiobiology today.
    • Biodistribution, pharmacokinetics and metabolism of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) using [¹⁸F]-IL1RA and PET imaging in rats.

      Cawthorne, Christopher; Prenant, C; Smigova, A; Julyan, Peter J; Maroy, R; Herholz, K; Rothwell, N; Boutin, H; Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. (2011-02)
      Positron emission tomography (PET) has the potential to improve our understanding of the preclinical pharmacokinetics and metabolism of therapeutic agents, and is easily translated to clinical studies in humans. However, studies involving proteins radiolabelled with clinically relevant PET isotopes are currently limited. Here we illustrate the potential of PET imaging in a preclinical study of the biodistribution and metabolism of ¹⁸F-labelled IL-1 receptor antagonist ([¹⁸F]IL-1RA) using a novel [¹⁸F]-radiolabelling technique.
    • The hypoxia-selective cytotoxin NLCQ-1 (NSC 709257) controls metastatic disease when used as an adjuvant to radiotherapy.

      Lunt, S; Cawthorne, Christopher; Ali, M; Telfer, B; Babur, M; Smigova, A; Julyan, Peter J; Price, Patricia M; Stratford, I; Bloomer, W; et al. (2010-07-13)
      BACKGROUND: Metastases cause most cancer-related deaths. We investigated the use of hypoxia-selective cytotoxins as adjuvants to radiotherapy in the control of metastatic tumour growth. METHODS: The NLCQ-1, RB6145 and tirapazamine were assessed against the spontaneously metastasising KHT model. Subcutaneous KHT tumours (250 mm(3)) were irradiated with 25 Gy (single fraction) to control primary growth. Equitoxic drug treatments (NLCQ-1 (10 mg kg(-1)) once daily; RB6145 (75 mg kg(-1)) and tirapazamine (13 mg kg(-1)) twice daily) were administered 3-6 days post-radiotherapy when hypoxic cells were evident in lung micrometastases. Mice were culled when 50% of controls exhibited detrimental signs of lung metastases. RESULTS: In total, 95% of control mice presented with lung disease. This was significantly reduced by NLCQ-1 (33%; P=0.0002) and RB6145 (60%; P=0.02). Semi-quantitative grading of lung disease revealed a significant improvement with all treatments, with NLCQ-1 proving most efficacious (median grades: control, 4; NLCQ, 0 (P<0.0001); RB6145, 1 (P<0.001), tirapazamine, 3 (P=0.007)). Positron emission tomography (PET) was evaluated as a non-invasive means of assessing metastatic development. Primary and metastatic KHT tumours showed robust uptake of [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([(18)F]FDG). Metastatic burden discernable by [(18)F]FDG PET correlated well with macroscopic and histological lung analysis. CONCLUSION: The hypoxia-selective cytotoxin NLCQ-1 controls metastatic disease and may be a successful adjuvant to radiotherapy in the clinical setting.